apostasy


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a·pos·ta·sy

 (ə-pŏs′tə-sē)
n. pl. a·pos·ta·sies
Abandonment of one's religious faith, a political party, one's principles, or a cause.

[Middle English apostasie, from Old French, from Late Latin apostasia, defection, from Late Greek apostasiā, from Greek apostasis, revolt, from aphistanai, aposta-, to revolt : apo-, apo- + histanai, to stand, place; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

apostasy

(əˈpɒstəsɪ)
n, pl -sies
abandonment of one's religious faith, party, a cause, etc
[C14: from Church Latin apostasia, from Greek apostasis desertion, from apostanai to stand apart from, desert]

a•pos•ta•sy

(əˈpɒs tə si)

n., pl. -sies.
renunciation or abandonment of one's religious faith or of an object of one's previous loyalty.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin apostasia < Greek: a standing away, withdrawing]

apostasy

- Abandonment or renunciation of one's religion or morals.
See also related terms for religion.

apostasy

relinquishing of a religious belief. — apostate, n., adj.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apostasy - the state of having rejected your religious beliefs or your political party or a cause (often in favor of opposing beliefs or causes)
rejection - the state of being rejected
2.apostasy - the act of abandoning a party for cause
abandonment, desertion, forsaking - the act of giving something up

apostasy

noun desertion, defection, treachery, heresy, disloyalty, backsliding, perfidy, unfaithfulness, falseness, faithlessness, recreance or recreancy (archaic) a charge of apostasy

apostasy

noun
An instance of defecting from or abandoning a cause:
Translations
odpadlictví
Apostasie
ارتداد
apostasia

apostasy

[əˈpɒstəsɪ] Napostasía f

apostasy

[əˈpɒstəsi] (formal) napostasie f

apostasy

nAbfall m; (Rel also) → Apostasie f (form)
References in classic literature ?
"It appears," said the baron, seating himself in the armchair opposite that occupied by Milady, and stretching out his legs carelessly upon the hearth, "it appears we have made a little apostasy!"
This was what he had got by apostasy, and his punishment was deserved.
You can't even deny that I am within my rights if I claim now at this instant the reward for my apostasy."
I had been more than half suspicious of the seeming sincerity of the Kaolian jeddak's sudden apostasy, but the alacrity with which he embraced my suggestion, and the despatch with which a force of officers and men were placed at my disposal entirely removed the last vestige of my doubts.
This Man, born and now upgrown, To shew him worthy of his birth divine And high prediction, henceforth I expose To Satan; let him tempt, and now assay His utmost subtlety, because he boasts And vaunts of his great cunning to the throng Of his Apostasy. He might have learnt Less overweening, since he failed in Job, Whose constant perseverance overcame Whate'er his cruel malice could invent.
If the annals of apostasy offer anything comparable to such a declaration as that, I can only say that the case in point is not producible from the stores of my reading.
Its incurable disease was an apostasy from the principles of the Declaration of Independence.
"I thank thee for thy good intentions, friend Sancho," answered Don Quixote, "but I would have thee know that all these things I am doing are not in joke, but very much in earnest, for anything else would be a transgression of the ordinances of chivalry, which forbid us to tell any lie whatever under the penalties due to apostasy; and to do one thing instead of another is just the same as lying; so my knocks on the head must be real, solid, and valid, without anything sophisticated or fanciful about them, and it will be needful to leave me some lint to dress my wounds, since fortune has compelled us to do without the balsam we lost."
Can they confirm the shocking intelligence which has reached her of the "apostasy" of Mrs.
But neither did we touch again on what Raffles professed to have forgotten--my "apostasy," my "lapse into virtue," as he had been pleased to call it.
But in the confessional, or at night, when praying, she wept often, imploring God's forgiveness for the apostasy of the man who thought the contrary of what he professed, and who desired the destruction of the aristocracy and the Church,--the two religions of the house of Cormon.
Also that hankering after an overt or practical effect seems to me an apostasy. In good earnest I am willing to spare this most unnecessary deal of doing.