apothecary

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Related to apothecaries: Apothecaries weight

a·poth·e·car·y

 (ə-pŏth′ĭ-kĕr′ē)
n. pl. a·poth·e·car·ies
1. One that prepares and sells drugs and other medicines; a pharmacist.
2. See pharmacy.

[Middle English apotecarie, from Old French apotecaire and from Medieval Latin apothēcārius, both from Late Latin, clerk, from Latin apothēca, storehouse, from Greek apothēkē : apo-, away; see apo- + thēkē, receptacle; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

apothecary

(əˈpɒθɪkərɪ)
n, pl -caries
1. (Pharmacology) an archaic word for pharmacist
2. (Law) law a chemist licensed by the Society of Apothecaries of London to prescribe, prepare, and sell drugs
[C14: from Old French apotecaire, from Late Latin apothēcārius warehouseman, from apothēca, from Greek apothēkē storehouse]

a•poth•e•car•y

(əˈpɒθ əˌkɛr i)

n., pl. -car•ies.
1. a druggist; pharmacist.
2. a pharmacy; drugstore.
[1325–75; Middle English (< Old French) < Medieval Latin apothēcārius seller of spices and drugs, Late Latin: shopkeeper]

apothecary

1. apharmacy.
2. a pharmacist.
See also: Drugs
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apothecary - a health professional trained in the art of preparing and dispensing drugsapothecary - a health professional trained in the art of preparing and dispensing drugs
caregiver, health care provider, health professional, PCP, primary care provider - a person who helps in identifying or preventing or treating illness or disability
pharmaceutical chemist, pharmacologist - someone trained in the science of drugs (their composition and uses and effects)
Translations
apotekaapotekarljekarnaljekarnik
patikapatikus
apótekapótekari
lekarna

apothecary

(o.f.) [əˈpɒθɪkərɪ] Nboticario m

apothecary

[əˈpɒθɪkri] (old-fashioned) napothicaire m

apothecary

n (old)Apotheker(in) m(f); apothecaries’ weights and measuresApothekergewichte und -maße

apothecary

[əˈpɒθɪkərɪ] nfarmacista m/f
References in classic literature ?
The people wherewith you plant ought to be gardeners, ploughmen, laborers, smiths, carpenters, joiners, fishermen, fowlers, with some few apothecaries, surgeons, cooks, and bakers.
This doctor therefore proposed, "that upon the meeting of the senate, certain physicians should attend it the three first days of their sitting, and at the close of each day's debate feel the pulses of every senator; after which, having maturely considered and consulted upon the nature of the several maladies, and the methods of cure, they should on the fourth day return to the senate house, attended by their apothecaries stored with proper medicines; and before the members sat, administer to each of them lenitives, aperitives, abstersives, corrosives, restringents, palliatives, laxatives, cephalalgics, icterics, apophlegmatics, acoustics, as their several cases required; and, according as these medicines should operate, repeat, alter, or omit them, at the next meeting.
Making Medicines in Early Colonial Lima, Peru: Apothecaries, Science and Society
I start with research: for The Blackthorn Key, I learned about apothecaries and Restoration London; for Mark of the Plague, it was the Great Plague and epidemics.
Book Apothecary is inspired by the original apothecaries of the 19th Century.
Andrew Sneddon's cogent analysis of the ways in which questions of authority and institutional control shaped the relationship between physicians and apothecaries illuminates the political dimensions of drug regulation legislation, but focuses less on issues pertaining to apothecaries' access to training opportunities or occupational boundaries.
Merz Apothecary is one of the country's oldest pharmacies and natural health apothecaries.
Unlike histories which describe developments in 17th and 18th century apothecaries and pharmacies, Shaw (history of early modern Italy, U.
However her life straddles the tense juncture between three professions: university-trained doctors surgeons who learn their trade on the battlefield and the apothecaries.
1) Given current re-evaluations of the trade affiliations of London's playing industries in the early-modern period, this mention opens intriguing lines of inquiry into the role of apothecaries in providing special makeup effects for the court and possibly the public stage.
As he bought antique armoires and apothecaries, marble floors and Zen tea gardens, he hid them from his lieutenants, lest they remind him that he'd overspent again.
Modern botanical taxonomy, the systematic naming of plants, arose out of necessity: Early-17th-century apothecaries needed to know whether the herbs going into their medicines were the real deal.