apothegm

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ap·o·thegm

also ap·o·phthegm  (ăp′ə-thĕm′)
n.
A terse, witty, instructive saying; a maxim.

[Greek apophthegma, from apophthengesthai, to speak plainly : apo-, intensive pref.; see apo- + phthengesthai, phtheg-, to speak.]

ap′o·theg·mat′ic (-thĕg-măt′ĭk), ap′o·theg·mat′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
ap′o·theg·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apothegm

(ˈæpəˌθɛm)
n
a variant spelling of apophthegm
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ap•o•thegm

or ap•o•phthegm

(ˈæp əˌθɛm)

n.
a short, pithy saying.
[1545–55; < Greek apóphthegma <apophtheg-, variant s. of apophthéngesthai to speak out]
ap`o•theg•mat′ic (-θɛgˈmæt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

apothegm

- A terse, pointed saying or pithy maxim; it is pronounced AP-uh-them and may also be spelled apophthegm.
See also related terms for pointed.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apothegm - a short pithy instructive saying
axiom, maxim - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The notion that a borrower is precluded from challenging a holder's right of enforcement is often expressed apothegmatically as: "Even a thief is entitled to enforce a bearer instrument." (34) Needless to say, the assertion that a thief can obtain or pass title to stolen property flies in the face of common law.
Later in his response, CREWS remarks apothegmatically, "The subject matter of literary study is not human nature; it is literature." Literature is produced by human nature, depicted in it, and fulfilled by it.