apparent magnitude


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

apparent magnitude

n.

apparent magnitude

n
(Astronomy) another name for magnitude4
Translations
References in classic literature ?
At his decease, there is only a vacancy, and a momentary eddy,--very small, as compared with the apparent magnitude of the ingurgitated object,--and a bubble or two, ascending out of the black depth and bursting at the surface.
According to NASA, the nebula has an apparent magnitude of 6, which makes it bright enough to be spotted using a pair of binoculars.
Eleazar added that the apparent magnitude of shabu that the laboratory was capable of producing and its ties to the foreign chemist suggested the group was engaged in a large-scale, potentially nationwide, drug operation.
Last year, Juno had an apparent magnitude of 9.8 during opposition.
Weather permitting, the glint could have an apparent magnitude of -8.1, which means it will be 500 times brighter than Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky.
"We suggest that the partially drawn object is HB9 since it would be irregular and that the second bright object is Moon since the apparent magnitude of HB9 is closer to that of the Moon," Joglekar said.
Koichi Itagaki, Japan, discovered an apparent magnitude 6.8 nova on an unfiltered CCD frame of 2013 August 14.58 UT using an 180mm reflector.
The distance modulus [mu] = m - M is the difference between the apparent magnitude m and the absolute magnitude M.
A star is classified as variable if its apparent magnitude as seen from Earth changes over time, whether the changes are due to variations in the star's actual luminosity, or to variations in the amount of the star's light that is blocked from reaching Earth.
The brighter the object, the smaller the apparent magnitude. Table 16 (p79) lists the brightest stars visible from Southern Africa.
The reader is cautioned to rely on the results of the statistical tests rather than on the apparent magnitude of the difference between groups" (NCES, 2008).
A star's apparent magnitude, or its brightness as seen from Earth, depends on its temperature, size, and distance from Earth.