appetition


Also found in: Medical.

appetition

(ˌæpəˈtɪʃən)
n
a desire or craving directed towards a specific object, goal, or purpose
References in periodicals archive ?
For from this it follows, first, that human beings think themselves to be free in so far as they are conscious of their volitions and of their appetite, and do not even dream of the causes by which they are led to appetition and to will, since they are ignorant of them.
Fendt uses 'desire' interchangeably with 'eros', and never qualifies the scope of either: we shift between erotic desire and appetition more generally.
Naturalism," according to Rawls, "is the universe in which all relations are natural and in which spiritual life is reduced to the level of desire and appetition.
sensory and perceptional: through sense cognition and appetition persons perceive, take interest in and interact with the sensible world around them; all human knowledge, whether sensory or intellectual, begins with sense perceptions;
Rhetoric "creates an informed appetition for the good" (90) and its "function is an art of embodying an order of desire.
Purpose involves a distinction between what is and what might be and an appetition for some form of what might be.
Subjects, that is, persons, arise when bodies become organized enough (think of Aristotle's "natural body potentially alive") to affirm their own identity, first in acts of simple appetition and avoidance, then in appropriations of the past and anticipations of the future, but always by asserting interests--making claims upon their surroundings.
What accounts for the distinction between them is that the property terms "one," "true," and "good" connote, respectively, a twofold negation, an aptitude to conform to intellect, or a suitability to appetition.
Appetition constitutes an important form of action.
It is appetition that accounts for the monad's indivisibility, while the infinite set of perceptions accounts for its distinctness from all other monads.