appointor


Also found in: Legal.
Related to appointor: Appointer, Non-Discretionary Trust

ap·poin·tor

 (ə-poin′tər, ə-poin′tôr′)
n.
One who directs the disposition of property by power that has been legally granted, as by a trust or deed.

appointor

(əˈpɔɪntə; əpɔɪnˈtɔː)
n
(Law) property law a person to whom a power to nominate persons to take property is given by deed or will. See also power of appointment
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References in periodicals archive ?
It does so whilst seeking to protect the general interests of its appointor's customers, at ports and harbors worldwide.
Halford, (35) one of the first reported decisions in which such objections were raised, Vice-Chancellor Hall was emphatic that he could not</p> <pre> in the absence of authority say that a parent or appointor ...
[Over time] it became usual, especially in the case of great landowners, to appoint attorneys to attend to all suits which might arise during a specified period during the life of the appointor, or in a particular county or court.
The person being appointed should be someone the appointor trusts and a person with whom they can discuss their views about what they want to happen should they lose capacity.
While the administrative receiver is able to obtain new financing in order to maintain the business while attempting to sell the company or assets, the new financing does not receive priority over existing claims.(11) Moreover, the receiver is personally liable for all post-commencement financing.(12) Any new financing is typically provided by the debenture holder which appointed the receiver (the appointor).
(124.) Thomas, supra note 119, at 151 ("The conflict between nominee directors' loyalty to the company in company law theory and their loyalty to the appointor in commercial practice is readily apparent.").
In the UK, there is little communication between the receiver and creditors other than his appointor. This lack of need for ongoing consultation makes the receivership process relatively fast and therefore of short duration, perhaps only months or weeks.
were appointees of friendly district court judges, and appointors of
Thomas, The Role of Nominee Directors and the Liability of Their Appointors, in Corporate Governance and the Duties of Company Directors 148,150 (Ian Ramsay ed., 1997) (describing "[l]oyalty inspired by selection, and confirmed by the confidence which the appointors repose in their nominees").
Under Section 5, Chapter V of Thoughts 011 Nigerian Constitution, I have proposed the establishment of a COLLEGE OF APPOINTORS which, I believe, will make the appointment of the members of these Commissions completely free from any political influence.
Effective Utilization of Arbitrators and Arbitration Institutions in Africa by Appointors. PDF from soas.ac.uk.
In the public sector, the appointors of an organization's governing body do not necessarily have an ongoing financial interest.