apposition


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Related to apposition: bone apposition

apposition

placing together or bringing into proximity; juxtaposition; the addition of one thing to another thing: The new parking structure was built in apposition to the library. In grammar, a syntactic relation between expressions having the same function and relation to other elements in the sentence, with the second expression identifying the first: John, my old boyfriend, showed up at my wedding. The phrase, my old boyfriend, is in apposition with John.
Not to be confused with:
opposition – resistance; antagonism or hostility; those opposing or protesting something or someone: The opposition is getting more votes.

ap·po·si·tion

 (ăp′ə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. Grammar
a. A construction in which a noun or noun phrase is placed with another as an explanatory equivalent, both having the same syntactic relation to the other elements in the sentence; for example, Copley and the painter in The painter Copley was born in Boston.
b. The relationship between such nouns or noun phrases.
2. A placing side by side or next to each other.
3. Biology The growth of successive layers of a cell wall.

[Middle English apposicioun, from Latin appositiō, appositiōn-, from appositus, past participle of appōnere, to put near; see apposite.]

ap′po·si′tion·al adj.
ap′po·si′tion·al·ly adv.

apposition

(ˌæpəˈzɪʃən)
n
1. a putting into juxtaposition
2. (Grammar) a grammatical construction in which a word, esp a noun phrase, is placed after another to modify its meaning
3. (Biology) biology growth in the thickness of a cell wall by the deposition of successive layers of material. Compare intussusception2
ˌappoˈsitional adj

ap•po•si•tion

(ˌæp əˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of placing together or bringing into proximity.
2. the addition of one thing to another thing.
3. a grammatical relation between expressions, usu. consecutive, that have the same referent and the same relation to other elements in the sentence, as between our first president and Washington in Washington, our first president, was born in Virginia.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin appositiō]
ap`po•si′tion•al, adj.
ap`po•si′tion•al•ly, adv.

apposition

A grammatical construction in which one noun or noun phrase explains another immediately next to it, for example, in “Picasso, the painter.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apposition - a grammatical relation between a word and a noun phrase that follows; "`Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer' is an example of apposition"
limiting, qualifying, modification - the grammatical relation that exists when a word qualifies the meaning of the phrase
2.apposition - (biology) growth in the thickness of a cell wall by the deposit of successive layers of material
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
3.apposition - the act of positioning close together (or side by side)apposition - the act of positioning close together (or side by side); "it is the result of the juxtaposition of contrasting colors"
locating, positioning, emplacement, location, placement, position - the act of putting something in a certain place
tessellation - the careful juxtaposition of shapes in a pattern; "a tessellation of hexagons"
Translations
přístavek

apposition

[ˌæpəˈzɪʃən] N
1. [of position] → yuxtaposición f
2. (Gram) → aposición f
in appositionen aposición

apposition

[ˌæpəˈzɪʃən] n (GRAMMAR)apposition f
in apposition → en apposition

apposition

nApposition f, → Beifügung f; A is in apposition to B, A and B are in appositionA ist eine Apposition zu B

apposition

[ˌæpəˈzɪʃn] n (Gram) → apposizione f
References in classic literature ?
A man at the very lowest point of the social scale was easier and more agreeable for the fallen gentleman to encounter than a person at any of the intermediate degrees; and, moreover, as Clifford's young manhood had been lost, he was fond of feeling himself comparatively youthful, now, in apposition with the patriarchal age of Uncle Venner.
Jadoon argued that all apposition parties had objections over new appointments in ECP.
The Rahbar Committee will consist of members from apposition's political parties.
Presidential candidates include former defense minister Mohamed Ould Cheikh Mohamed Ahmed Ghazouani, former prime minister Sidi Mohamed Ould Boubacar, apposition candidate Mohamed Ould Moulou, human rights activist Biram Ould Dah Ould Abeid, Baba former parliamentarian Hamidou Kane and financial expert Mohamed Lemine El Mourteji El Wavi.
Atambayev is now in apposition. At some point, he might become a leader of systemic and non-systemic opposition either knowingly or unknowingly.
Eradicating corruption is a must but Government should take apposition and political parties in confidence before going into major decisions.
The next-generation Pantheris design includes a simplified single balloon system for cutter apposition and blood flow management, a stiffer shaft for increased pushability, a more robust nosecone with the option for more tissue storage capacity, and an enhanced cutter design.
'It would especially be a bad message if we were to have a scenario some believe we might have, that we will not be in apposition to constitute the House of Peoples, which then appoints the FBiH President and the FBiH Government, but I believe that this will not happen,' said the BiH Presidency Chairman Bakir IzetbegoviA.
Postoperative radiographs showed good apposition and alignment of the fracture and correct positioning of the implants (Fig 2).
However, the President noted the government was seeking "to strike a truthful and sustainable peace deal with conciliatory Taliban," and the armed apposition who have had links with international or regional terror groups will not be accepted.
On the Beighton score, she received all (9) scores: passive apposition of the thumb to forearm and passive dorsal hyperextension of the metacarpophalangeal joint >90[degrees] on both sides were done with no strain (Figure 2); she was able to actively hyperextend both elbows and knees on both sides over >10[degrees] and flex her spine to the ground with palms placed on the ground without knee flexing.
With selective bone removal and apposition, the tooth moves through the alveolar bone, carrying its attachment apparatus with it.