apriorism


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apriorism

(eɪˈpraɪəˌrɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that there may be genuine knowledge independent of experience. Compare rationalism2, sensationalism3

apriorism

1. the method of a priori reasoning, i.e., deductive reasoning, from cause to effect or from the general to the particular.
2. an a priori principle.
See also: Logic
References in periodicals archive ?
This emotional, intuitive apriorism bred fateful habits of the pen in Rousseau, who had no equal in asserting truths for which his readers learned to expect no verification.
"Mises's Apriorism Against Relativism in Economics." April 25.
And all these statements implied in the regression theorem are enounced apodictically as implied in the apriorism of praxeology.
To use them in this way does not imply any apriorism, because these purely logical probability statements are not meant to be used in isolation but rather in application to the concrete knowledge situation at the time of the decision.
the apriorism's thesis: there are, in addition to empirical judgments, some judgments which do not come from experience, but have an "a priori" character.
deepens his analysis of the Vorgriff as "an anticipatory sense that orients particular things apprehended by the human intellect toward their sustaining ground" (75) in the infinite mystery of God (in sharp contrast to Heidegger's apriorism of human finitude).
Apriorism, introspection, and the axiom of action: a realist solution.
More importantly, as we will explain below, technical and philosophical aspects of the ideographic framework in some cases have been turned into landscapes of authoritarianism and apriorism [3].
Otra realidad implica la posibilidad de otro lenguaje, ese por ejemplo que (en las palabras de Paul Ernest sobre Wittgenstein) queda articulado "[by] the notions of logical and mathematical necessity, and the logical compulsion to follow a rule, which lie at the heart of absolutism and apriorism" (94).
Lincoln's propositional apriorism mirrors the German idealism imported into the United States in the first half of the 19th century (at times secondhand via France and England).
The problem with the evental realism of Badiou and Zizek is its relentless apriorism. At the end of ever chain of conditions of possibility we fing the final a priori, which is the real itself: an unknowable and un-experienceable multiplicity.