aqueduct

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aqueduct
Pont du Gard,
near Nîmes, France

aq·ue·duct

 (ăk′wĭ-dŭkt′)
n.
1.
a. A pipe or channel designed to transport water from a remote source, usually by gravity.
b. A bridgelike structure supporting a conduit or canal passing over a river or low ground.
2. Anatomy A channel or passage in an organ or a body part, especially such a channel for conveying fluid.

[Latin aquaeductus : aquae, genitive of aqua, water; see aqua + ductus, a leading; see duct.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aqueduct

(ˈækwɪˌdʌkt)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a conduit used to convey water over a long distance, either by a tunnel or more usually by a bridge
2. (Civil Engineering) a structure, usually a bridge, that carries such a conduit or a canal across a valley or river
3. (Anatomy) a channel in an organ or part of the body, esp one that conveys a natural body fluid
[C16: from Latin aquaeductus, from aqua water + dūcere to convey]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

aq•ue•duct

(ˈæk wɪˌdʌkt)

n.
1.
a. a conduit or artificial channel for conducting water from a distance.
b. a bridgelike structure that carries a water conduit or canal across a valley or over a river.
2. Anat. a canal through which liquids pass.
[1535–45; < Medieval Latin aquēductus < Latin aquae ductus a drawing off of water; see aqua, duct]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

aqueduct

An elevated masonry or brick channel for carrying water, widely used by the Romans.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aqueduct - a conduit that resembles a bridge but carries water over a valleyaqueduct - a conduit that resembles a bridge but carries water over a valley
arch - (architecture) a masonry construction (usually curved) for spanning an opening and supporting the weight above it
conduit - a passage (a pipe or tunnel) through which water or electric wires can pass; "the computers were connected through a system of conduits"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

aqueduct

noun conduit, channel, passage, canal, waterway, duct, sluice an old Roman aqueduct
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
akvedukti
akvaduktakvedukt
vodovod

aqueduct

[ˈækwɪdʌkt] Nacueducto m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

aqueduct

[ˈækwɪdʌkt] naqueduc m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

aqueduct

nAquädukt m or nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

aqueduct

[ˈækwɪˌdʌkt] nacquedotto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Nothing can be more curious than to see the channels and aqueducts that nature has formed in this hard rock, so exact and of such admirable contrivance, that they seem to be the work of men.
It has accomplished wonders far surpassing Egyptian pyramids, Roman aqueducts, and Gothic cathedrals; it has conducted expeditions that put in the shade all former Exoduses of nations and crusades.
He brought our Saviour to the western side Of that high mountain, whence he might behold Another plain, long, but in breadth not wide, Washed by the southern sea, and on the north To equal length backed with a ridge of hills That screened the fruits of the earth and seats of men From cold Septentrion blasts; thence in the midst Divided by a river, off whose banks On each side an Imperial City stood, With towers and temples proudly elevate On seven small hills, with palaces adorned, Porches and theatres, baths, aqueducts, Statues and trophies, and triumphal arcs, Gardens and groves, presented to his eyes Above the highth of mountains interposed-- By what strange parallax, or optic skill Of vision, multiplied through air, or glass Of telescope, were curious to enquire.
He can see the broad green Campagna, stretching away toward the mountains, with its scattered arches and broken aqueducts of the olden time, so picturesque in their gray ruin, and so daintily festooned with vines.
Our society is encumbered by ponderous machinery, which resembles the endless aqueducts which the Romans built over hill and dale and which are superseded by the discovery of the law that water rises to the level of its source.
Beneath it he discerned the dismantled ramparts of a town; here the still intact arch of a portico, there two or three columns lying under their base; farther on, a succession of arches which must have supported the conduit of an aqueduct; in another part the sunken pillars of a gigantic bridge, run into the thickest parts of the rift.
Further on, some remains of a gigantic aqueduct; here the high base of an Acropolis, with the floating outline of a Parthenon; there traces of a quay, as if an ancient port had formerly abutted on the borders of the ocean, and disappeared with its merchant vessels and its war-galleys.
-- let us conceal ourselves in the arch of this aqueduct, and I will inform you presently of the origin of the commotion.
Human blood, in order to keep its freshness, should run in hidden streams, as the water of an aqueduct is conveyed in subterranean pipes.
After going through another dreamy place - a long aqueduct across the Alleghany River, which was stranger than the bridge at Harrisburg, being a vast, low, wooden chamber full of water - we emerged upon that ugly confusion of backs of buildings and crazy galleries and stairs, which always abuts on water, whether it be river, sea, canal, or ditch: and were at Pittsburg.
Just ahead of him in the roof of the aqueduct was a round, black hole about thirty inches in diameter.
At every half-mile a groaning water-wheel lifted the soft water from the river to the crops by way of a mud-built aqueduct. A foot or so wide was the water-channel; five foot or more high was the bank on which it ran, and its base was broad in proportion.