aquiculture

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aq·ui·cul·ture

 (ăk′wĭ-kŭl′chər, ä′kwĭ-)
n.
Variant of aquaculture.

aq′ui·cul′tur·al adj.
aq′ui·cul′tur·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aquiculture

(ˈeɪkwɪˌkʌltʃə; ˈækwɪ-)
n
1. (Agriculture) another name for hydroponics
2. (Agriculture) a variant of aquaculture
ˈaquiˌcultural adj
ˈaquiˌculturist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•dro•pon•ics

(ˌhaɪ drəˈpɒn ɪks)

n.
(used with a sing. v.) the cultivation of plants by placing the roots in liquid nutrient solutions rather than in soil; soilless growth of plants.
[1935–40; hydro-1 + (geo) ponics]
hy`dro•pon′ic, adj.
hy`dro•pon′i•cal•ly, adv.
hy•drop•o•nist (haɪˈdrɒp ə nɪst) hy`dro•pon′i•cist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

aquiculture

hydroponics. — aquicultural, adj.
See also: Plants
hydroponics. — aquicultural, adj.
See also: Water
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aquiculture - a technique of growing plants (without soil) in water containing dissolved nutrientsaquiculture - a technique of growing plants (without soil) in water containing dissolved nutrients
farming, husbandry, agriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
drip culture - a hydroponic method of growing plants by allowing nutrient solutions to drip slowly onto an inert medium in which the plants are growing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shrimp exports earned US$105 million in 1999 and are expected to increase to US$125 million in 2000, says the director of the National Association of Honduran Aquiculturists (ANDAH), Alberto Zelaya.