arabesque


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ar·a·besque

 (ăr′ə-bĕsk′)
n.
1. A ballet position executed while standing on one straight leg with one arm extended forward and the other arm and leg extended backward.
2. A complex, ornate design of intertwined floral, foliate, and geometric figures.
3. Music An ornate, whimsical composition especially for piano.
4. An intricate or elaborate pattern or design: "the complex arabesque of a camera movement" (Nigel Andrews).
adj.
In the fashion of or formed as an arabesque.

[French, from Italian arabesco, in Arabian fashion, from Arabo, an Arab, from Latin Arabus, from Arabs; see Arab.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

arabesque

(ˌærəˈbɛsk)
n
1. (Ballet) ballet a classical position in which the dancer has one leg raised behind and both arms stretched out in one of several conventional poses
2. (Classical Music) music a piece or movement with a highly ornamented or decorated melody
3. (Art Terms) arts
a. a type of curvilinear decoration in painting, metalwork, etc, with intricate intertwining leaf, flower, animal, or geometrical designs
b. a design of flowing lines
adj
4. (Ballet) designating, of, or decorated in this style
5. (Art Terms) designating, of, or decorated in this style
6. (Classical Music) designating, of, or decorated in this style
[C18: from French, from Italian arabesco in the Arabic style]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ar•a•besque

(ˌær əˈbɛsk)

n.
1. an ornamental style in which linear flowers, foliage, fruits, animals, and designs are represented in intricate patterns.
2. a pose in ballet in which the dancer stands on one leg with one arm extended in front and the other leg and arm extended behind.
3. a fanciful musical piece.
[1605–15; < French < Italian arabesco ornament in Islamic style, literally, Arabian]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

arabesque

1. A pose as though poised for flight, supported on one leg, the other extended backward and the arms disposed harmoniously, usually with the greatest reach.
2. An ornate musical passage.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arabesque - position in which the dancer has one leg raised behind and arms outstretched in a conventional posearabesque - position in which the dancer has one leg raised behind and arms outstretched in a conventional pose
ballet position - classical position of the body and especially the feet in ballet
2.arabesque - an ornament that interlaces simulated foliage in an intricate designarabesque - an ornament that interlaces simulated foliage in an intricate design
decoration, ornament, ornamentation - something used to beautify
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

arabesque

[ˌærəˈbesk] N (Ballet etc) → arabesco m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

arabesque

nArabeske f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

arabesque

[ˌærəˈbɛsk] narabesco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Indeed, whether on carpets, or curtains, or tapestry, or ottoman coverings, all upholstery of this nature should be rigidly Arabesque. As for those antique floor-cloth & still occasionally seen in the dwellings of the rabble - cloths of huge, sprawling, and radiating devises, stripe-interspersed, and glorious with all hues, among which no ground is intelligible-these are but the wicked invention of a race of time-servers and money-lovers - children of Baal and worshippers of Mammon - Benthams, who, to spare thought and economize fancy, first cruelly invented the Kaleidoscope, and then established joint-stock companies to twirl it by steam.
Fiction there was none at all that I can recall, except Poe's 'Tales of the Grotesque and the Arabesque' (I long afflicted myself as to what those words meant, when I might easily have asked and found out) and Bulwer's Last Days of Pompeii, all in the same kind of binding.
There were arabesque figures with unsuited limbs and appointments.
A far more, correct imagination than that of the pseudo-Herschel* had created them; and if they had been placed in rank and file, and copied by some skilful painter's hand, one would, without doubt, have exclaimed involuntarily, "What a beautiful arabesque!"
Wide galleries ran all around the four sides, whose Moorish arches, slender pillars, and arabesque ornaments, carried the mind back, as in a dream, to the reign of oriental romance in Spain.
The outside pattern is a florid arabesque, reminding one of a fungus.
The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque expression with any idea of simple humanity.
who has dared to frame therein that commonplace and heavy door of carved wood, à la Louis XV., beside the arabesques of Biscornette?
The friezes ornamented with arabesques, and the pediments which crowned the pilasters, conferred richness and grace on every part of the building, while the domes which surmounted the whole added proportion and majesty.
They trod a saraband: And the damned grotesques made arabesques,
His smallest acts were prepared and unexpected, his speeches grave, his sentences ominous like hints and complicated like arabesques. He was treated with a solemn respect accorded in the irreverent West only to the monarchs of the stage, and he accepted the profound homage with a sustained dignity seen nowhere else but behind the footlights and in the condensed falseness of some grossly tragic situation.
Across the front of the house, and up the spreading eaves and along the fanciful railings of the shallow porch, are elaborate carvings--wreaths, fruits, arabesques, verses from Scripture, names, dates, etc.