arbitrage

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ar·bi·trage

 (är′bĭ-träzh′)
n.
The simultaneous purchase and sale of equivalent assets or of the same asset in multiple markets in order to exploit a temporary discrepancy in prices.
intr.v. ar·bi·traged, ar·bi·trag·ing, ar·bi·trag·es
To be involved in arbitrage.

[Middle English, arbitration, from Old French, from arbitrer, to judge, from Latin arbitrārī, to give judgment; see arbitrate.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

arbitrage

(ˈɑːbɪˌtrɑːʒ; ˈɑːbɪtrɪdʒ)
n
(Banking & Finance) finance
a. the purchase of currencies, securities, or commodities in one market for immediate resale in others in order to profit from unequal prices
b. (as modifier): arbitrage operations.
[C15: from French, from arbitrer to arbitrate]
arbitrageur n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ar•bi•trage

(ˈɑr bɪˌtrɑʒ)

n., v. -traged, -trag•ing. n.
1. the simultaneous sale of a security or commodity in different markets to profit from unequal prices.
v.i.
2. to engage in arbitrage.
[1470–80; < Middle French, <arbitr(er) to arbitrate, regulate (< Latin arbitrārī; see arbitrate)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

arbitrage

the business of buying and selling securities, curreneies, and commodities on an international scale so as to take advantage of differences in rates of exchange and prices. — arbitrager, arbitrageur, n.
See also: Money
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

arbitrage

A situation in which it is possible to buy an asset in one market and then sell it immediately in another market at a higher price.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arbitrage - a kind of hedged investment meant to capture slight differences in pricearbitrage - a kind of hedged investment meant to capture slight differences in price; when there is a difference in the price of something on two different markets the arbitrageur simultaneously buys at the lower price and sells at the higher price
risk arbitrage, takeover arbitrage - arbitrage involving risk; as in the simultaneous purchase of stock in a target company and sale of stock in its potential acquirer; if the takeover fails the arbitrageur may lose a great deal of money
investing, investment - the act of investing; laying out money or capital in an enterprise with the expectation of profit
Verb1.arbitrage - practice arbitrage, as in the stock marketarbitrage - practice arbitrage, as in the stock market
commerce, commercialism, mercantilism - transactions (sales and purchases) having the objective of supplying commodities (goods and services)
merchandise, trade - engage in the trade of; "he is merchandising telephone sets"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

arbitrage

[ˌɑːbɪˈtrɑːʒ] Narbitraje m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

arbitrage

[ˈɑːrbɪtrɑːʒ] n (FINANCE)arbitrage m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"In the current financial scene, to consistently run successful arbitrages, there are multiple challenges we face to remain competitive.
The theme of the training centres on "Understanding and Executing Arbitrage 101".
This mismatch in TIPS--Treasury pricing is strongly related to supply factors, such as Treasury debt issuance and the availability of collateral in the financial markets, and is correlated with other types of fixed-income arbitrages. However, this study raises the issue of why the Treasury issues TIPS, since in so doing it both gives up a valuable fiscal hedging option and leaves large amounts of money on the table.
With a type of arbitrage strategy, investors can convert the inflation-linked cash flows from a TIPS issue into fixed cash flows using inflation swaps.
Investment banks have been doing these kinds of arbitrages for years with their own equity capital, but these strategies are relatively new to institutions.
* Japanese warrant arbitrage -- This primarily involves buying a Japanese warrant that trades cheaply and simultaneously selling short the underlying Japanese stock.
A logical point of departure in analyzing the efficiency of the betting market, as with financial markets, would be the identification of arbitrage opportunities.
The "arbitrage paradox," initially identified by Grossman and Stiglitz (1976, 1980), argues that the windows for pure arbitrage appear only when they become the most unanticipated by the currency- and/or credit markets.
Despite attention from governments, international organizations, and academics, the issue of international tax arbitrage, or private tax benefits arising from the conflict of tax laws between countries, has proven a difficult and at times intractable one.
This paper applies arbitrage theory as a means of valuing assets in urban low-income communities.