arbitrator


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ar·bi·tra·tor

 (är′bĭ-trā′tər)
n.
A person agreed upon or appointed to judge or decide a disputed issue; an arbiter.

ar•bi•tra•tor

(ˈɑr bɪˌtreɪ tər)

n.
a person empowered to decide a dispute or settle differences, as contract terms involving labor and management.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arbitrator - someone chosen to judge and decide a disputed issuearbitrator - someone chosen to judge and decide a disputed issue; "the critic was considered to be an arbiter of modern literature"; "the arbitrator's authority derived from the consent of the disputants"; "an umpire was appointed to settle the tax case"
evaluator, judge - an authority who is able to estimate worth or quality
third party - someone other than the principals who are involved in a transaction

arbitrator

noun judge, referee, umpire, arbiter, adjudicator He served as an arbitrator in a series of commercial disputes in India.

arbitrator

noun
A person, usually appointed, who decides the issues or results, or supervises the conduct, of a competition or conflict:
Sports: ref, ump.
Translations
rozhodčí
mæglervoldgiftsdommer
gerîardómsmaîur
arbiterarbitrážny rozhodca

arbitrator

[ˈɑːbɪtreɪtəʳ] Nárbitro/a m/f, mediador(a) m/f

arbitrator

[ˈɑːrbɪtreɪtər] narbitre m, médiateur/trice m/f

arbitrator

nVermittler(in) m(f); (esp Ind) → Schlichter(in) m(f)

arbitrator

[ˈɑːbɪtreɪtəʳ] narbitro

arbitrate

(ˈaːbitreit) verb
to act as an arbitrator in a dispute etc. He has been asked to arbitrate in the dispute between the workers and management.
ˌarbiˈtration noun
the making of a decision by an arbitrator. The dispute has gone / was taken to arbitration.
ˈarbitrator noun
a person who makes a judgement in a dispute etc.
References in classic literature ?
Moreover, although he had lived so long in the closest relations with the peasants, as farmer and arbitrator, and what was more, as adviser
Nor do I approve of his method of determining causes, when he would have the judge split the case which comes simply before him; and thus, instead of being a judge, become an arbitrator. Now when any matter is brought to arbitration, it is customary for many persons to confer together upon the business that is before them; but when a cause is brought before judges it is not so; and many legislators take care that the judges shall not have it in their power to communicate their sentiments to each other.
Thither let us bend all our thoughts, to learn What creatures there inhabit, of what mould, Or substance, how endu'd, and what thir Power, And where thir weakness, how attempted best, By force or suttlety: Though Heav'n be shut, And Heav'ns high Arbitrator sit secure In his own strength, this place may lye expos'd The utmost border of his Kingdom, left To their defence who hold it: here perhaps Som advantagious act may be achiev'd By sudden onset, either with Hell fire To waste his whole Creation, or possess All as our own, and drive as we were driven, The punie habitants, or if not drive, Seduce them to our Party, that thir God May prove thir foe, and with repenting hand Abolish his own works.
Shall we ask the prince to act as arbitrator?" he went on, addressing his uncle.
Master Pedro made him a bow, saying, "I expected no less of the rare Christianity of the valiant Don Quixote of La Mancha, true helper and protector of all destitute and needy vagabonds; master landlord here and the great Sancho Panza shall be the arbitrators and appraisers between your worship and me of what these dilapidated figures are worth or may be worth."
And so he went on, putting values on ever so many more smashed figures, which, after the two arbitrators had adjusted them to the satisfaction of both parties, came to forty reals and three-quarters; and over and above this sum, which Sancho at once disbursed, Master Pedro asked for two reals for his trouble in catching the ape.
Apart from the one fundamental nastiness the luckless mouse succeeds in creating around it so many other nastinesses in the form of doubts and questions, adds to the one question so many unsettled questions that there inevitably works up around it a sort of fatal brew, a stinking mess, made up of its doubts, emotions, and of the contempt spat upon it by the direct men of action who stand solemnly about it as judges and arbitrators, laughing at it till their healthy sides ache.
All the arbitrators agreed that this was monstrous, whereupon I contended that if they denied my right to the value in exchange, they must admit my right to the value in use.
This is mainly because the losing party does not want to comply with the award passed by the arbitrator and tries to seek relief through court.
In a no-fault suit with several interesting issues, the Supreme Court has upheld a master arbitrator's ruling that Merchants Preferred Insurance Company timely denied a hospital bill.
However, one question remains unanswered by the high court: When an arbitration provision is silent as to class arbitration and a party seeks to include a class in the arbitral proceedings, who decides arbitrability--the court or the arbitrator? Put another way, is the question simply a procedural issue to be decided by the arbitrator, or is it a "gateway" issue which must be decided by the court?
An entire award to a farmer who argued that his insurance company breached a contract was vacated because the arbitrator exceeded her authority by awarding extra-contractual damages, which can only be awarded by a court; and although her decision included contractual damages, which were allowed under the policy, it did not distinguish between amounts awarded for contract and non-contract claims.