arbour


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Related to arbour: Barbour

ar·bour

 (är′bər)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of arbor1.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

arbour

(ˈɑːbə)
n
1. (Forestry) a leafy glade or bower shaded by trees, vines, shrubs, etc, esp when trained about a trellis
2. (Horticulture) obsolete an orchard, garden, or lawn
[C14 erber, from Old French herbier, from Latin herba grass]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ar•bor1

(ˈɑr bər)

n.
1. a leafy, shady recess formed by tree branches, shrubs, etc.
2. a latticework bower intertwined with vines.
[1350–1400; Middle English (h)erber < Anglo-French, Old French (h)erbier herbarium]
ar′bored, adj.

ar•bor2

(ˈɑr bər)

n.
a. a bar, shaft, or axis that holds, turns, or supports a rotating cutting tool or grinding wheel.
b. a beam, shaft, axle, or spindle.
[1650–60; < French, Old French < Latin arbor wooden beam, tree]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arbour - a framework that supports climbing plantsarbour - a framework that supports climbing plants; "the arbor provided a shady resting place in the park"
framework - a structure supporting or containing something
grape arbor, grape arbour - an arbor where grapes are grown
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

arbour

noun alcove, corner, bay, shelter, retreat, niche, bower, compartment, recess, cubicle, nook, grotto, gazebo, cubbyhole The plan is to make an arbour of kiwi fruit vines.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

arbour

arbor (US) [ˈɑːbəʳ] Ncenador m, pérgola f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

arbour

[ˈɑːrr] n (= bower) → tonnelle f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

arbour

, (US) arbor
nLaube f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

arbour

arbor [ˈɑːbəʳ] npergolato
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The spinster aunt took up a large watering-pot which lay in one corner, and was about to leave the arbour. Mr.
There was the fat boy, perfectly motionless, with his large circular eyes staring into the arbour, but without the slightest expression on his face that the most expert physiognomist could have referred to astonishment, curiosity, or any other known passion that agitates the human breast.
There was an unwholesome little arbour in one dark corner, much frequented by the larger black slug, where I used to pass glorious afternoons making plans.
I made a step forward in the direction where the arbour ought to be, and the rustling and jingling of my clothes terrified me into immobility.
Middleton was returning through the grounds of Don Augustin, from a visit of duty to his encampment, at that hour in which the light of the sun begins to melt into the shadows of evening, when a glimpse of a robe, similar to that in which Inez had accompanied him to the altar, caught his eye through the foliage of a retired arbour. He approached the spot, with a delicacy that was rather increased than diminished by the claim she had perhaps given him to intrude on her private moments; but the sounds of her soft voice, which was offering up prayers, in which he heard himself named by the dearest of all appellations, overcame his scruples, and induced him to take a position where he might listen without the fear of detection.
"One hour," repeated Inez, as she kissed her hand to him; and then blushing, ashamed at her own boldness, she darted from the arbour, and was seen for an instant gliding towards the cottage of her nurse, in which, at the next moment, she disappeared.
We left him bestirring himself to feed the fowls, and we sat down to our punch in the arbour; where Wemmick told me as he smoked a pipe that it had taken him a good many years to bring the property up to its present pitch of perfection.
Some of these cabins were turreted, some had false windows painted on their rotten walls; one had a mimic clock, upon a crazy tower of four feet high, which screened the chimney; each in its little patch of ground had a rude seat or arbour. The population dealt in bones, in rags, in broken glass, in old wheels, in birds, and dogs.