arbour

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ar·bour

 (är′bər)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of arbor1.

arbour

(ˈɑːbə)
n
1. (Forestry) a leafy glade or bower shaded by trees, vines, shrubs, etc, esp when trained about a trellis
2. (Horticulture) obsolete an orchard, garden, or lawn
[C14 erber, from Old French herbier, from Latin herba grass]

ar•bor1

(ˈɑr bər)

n.
1. a leafy, shady recess formed by tree branches, shrubs, etc.
2. a latticework bower intertwined with vines.
[1350–1400; Middle English (h)erber < Anglo-French, Old French (h)erbier herbarium]
ar′bored, adj.

ar•bor2

(ˈɑr bər)

n.
a. a bar, shaft, or axis that holds, turns, or supports a rotating cutting tool or grinding wheel.
b. a beam, shaft, axle, or spindle.
[1650–60; < French, Old French < Latin arbor wooden beam, tree]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arbour - a framework that supports climbing plantsarbour - a framework that supports climbing plants; "the arbor provided a shady resting place in the park"
framework - a structure supporting or containing something
grape arbor, grape arbour - an arbor where grapes are grown

arbour

noun alcove, corner, bay, shelter, retreat, niche, bower, compartment, recess, cubicle, nook, grotto, gazebo, cubbyhole The plan is to make an arbour of kiwi fruit vines.
Translations

arbour

arbor (US) [ˈɑːbəʳ] Ncenador m, pérgola f

arbour

[ˈɑːrr] n (= bower) → tonnelle f

arbour

, (US) arbor
nLaube f

arbour

arbor [ˈɑːbəʳ] npergolato
References in classic literature ?
The spinster aunt took up a large watering-pot which lay in one corner, and was about to leave the arbour.
There was an unwholesome little arbour in one dark corner, much frequented by the larger black slug, where I used to pass glorious afternoons making plans.
Middleton was returning through the grounds of Don Augustin, from a visit of duty to his encampment, at that hour in which the light of the sun begins to melt into the shadows of evening, when a glimpse of a robe, similar to that in which Inez had accompanied him to the altar, caught his eye through the foliage of a retired arbour.
At last, when we got to his place of business and he pulled out his key from his coat-collar, he looked as unconscious of his Walworth property as if the Castle and the drawbridge and the arbour and the lake and the fountain and the Aged, had all been blown into space together by the last discharge of the Stinger.