archaeal


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archaeal

(ɑːˈkiːəl)
adj
relating to or involving the order Archaea
References in periodicals archive ?
Increasing numbers of investigations have indicated that the archaeal amoA gene is ubiquitous in waters, sediments, coral reefs, and soils of various environmental conditions (Beman et al.
For example, many bacterial and archaeal species reside in and on the human body and constitute the human microbiota," Nasir said.
The 16S rRNA genes have been used as the marker gene to determine the composition of both bacterial and archaeal communities because it is phylogenetically conserved and it does not laterally transfer [25].
Digging deeper to find unique microbial communities: the strong effect of depth on the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities in soil.
When a hypolimnion remains anoxic, obligately anaerobic prokaryotic populations, including Archaeal methanogens, presumably increase, but a lake that never has an oxygenated hypolimnion due to salt-induced stratification likely produces more methane because conditions that favor methanogen growth are persistent.
Impact of virioplankton on archaeal and bacterial community richness as assessed in seawater batch cultures.
The team also correlated archaeal abundance with skin dryness, as middle-aged persons have higher sebum levels and thus molster skin than the elderly.
Thermophiles including bacterial and archaeal species are found in various geothermally heated regions of the earth such as hot springs and deepsea hydrothermal vents.
Bacterial and Archaeal diversity in high altitude wetlands of the Chilean Altiplano.
Omnipotent role of archaeal elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a in translational elongation and termination and quality control of protein synthesis.