archaeoastronomy

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ar·chae·o·as·tron·o·my

 (är′kē-ō-ə-strŏn′ə-mē)
n.
The study of the knowledge, interpretations, and practices of ancient cultures regarding celestial objects or phenomena.

ar′chae·o·as·tron′o·mer n.
ar′chae·o·as′tro·nom′i·cal (-ăs′trə-nŏm′ĭ-kəl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

archaeoastronomy

(ˌɑːkɪəʊəˈstrɒnəmɪ) or

archeoastronomy

n
(Astronomy) the scientific study of the beliefs and practices concerning astronomy that existed in ancient and prehistoric civilizations
ˌarchaeoasˈtronomer, ˌarcheoasˈtronomer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
arkeoastronomi
arkeoastronomi
References in periodicals archive ?
Archaeoastronomer Clive Ruggles of the University of Leicester in England discovered the labyrinth--a single path leading to and from an earthen mound, with a series of disorienting twists and turns along its fiat, 4.4-kilometer-long course--by walking it himself.
In conjunction with the exhibition, archaeoastronomer Anthony Aveni presents his lecture The End of Time: The Maya Mystery of 2012 (March 20, 7-8 pm), an authoritative interpretation of the Maya Long Count calendar and the Maya universe.
Carlson, an archaeoastronomer who writes extensively on the Maya, contributed introductory essays for Chapters I and II, while Parsons wrote Chapters III, IV, and V on the Coastal Lowlands, Mexican Highlands, and on the Andean area.
According to Anthony Aveni, a Maya expert and archaeoastronomer at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York, "I got into an email dialogue with a high school student who was quite seriously concerned that the world was going to end.
Last year a class of 28 Americans from the University of California in Los Angeles spent two weeks studying the country's historical sites under the leadership of archaeoastronomer and Sky & Telescope contributing editor E.
"[This unpredictable refraction casts doubt on some claims by archaeoastronomers that ancient stone walls and monuments are aligned with the rising and setting directions of specific celestial objects.