archaeopteryx


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ar·chae·op·ter·yx

 (är′kē-ŏp′tər-ĭks)
n.
A small extinct vertebrate of the genus Archaeopteryx of the Jurassic Period, having feathered wings with claws and a long toothed snout. It has been classified variously as a prehistoric bird and as a theropod dinosaur.

[New Latin Archaeopteryx, genus name : archaeo- + Greek pterux, wing; see pet- in Indo-European roots.]

archaeopteryx

(ˌɑːkɪˈɒptərɪks)
n
1. (Animals) any of several extinct primitive birds constituting the genus Archaeopteryx, esp A. lithographica, which occurred in Jurassic times and had teeth, a long tail, well-developed wings, and a body covering of feathers
2. (Palaeontology) any of several extinct primitive birds constituting the genus Archaeopteryx, esp A. lithographica, which occurred in Jurassic times and had teeth, a long tail, well-developed wings, and a body covering of feathers
[C19: from archaeo- + Greek pterux winged creature]

ar•chae•op•ter•yx

(ˌɑr kiˈɒp tə rɪks)

n.
a reptilelike feathered fossil bird of the genus Archaeopteryx, from the late Jurassic Period, having teeth and a long tail.
[1855–60; < New Latin < Greek archaio- archaeo- + ptéryx wing]

ar·chae·op·ter·yx

(är′kē-ŏp′tər-ĭks)
An extinct primitive bird of the Jurassic Period, having characteristics of both birds and dinosaurs. Like dinosaurs, it had a long, bony tail, claws at the end of its fingers, and teeth. Like birds it had wings and feathers. Many scientists regard it as evidence that birds evolved from small meat-eating dinosaurs. See Note at bird.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.archaeopteryx - extinct primitive toothed bird of the Jurassic period having a long feathered tail and hollow bonesarchaeopteryx - extinct primitive toothed bird of the Jurassic period having a long feathered tail and hollow bones; usually considered the most primitive of all birds
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
genus Archaeopteryx, genus Archeopteryx - a genus of fossil birds
References in periodicals archive ?
"The oldest bird is still Archaeopteryx first found in the Late Jurassic of southern Germany in 1861, although some species from China are a little older," said Professor Mike Benton, lead author of the study published in the Journal of Trends in Ecology & Evolution.
It is the second bird capable of flight, after the famous Archaeopteryx, to be identified from this era.
The findings, published in PLOS Computational Biology, provide new insights into the origin of avian flight, which has been a point of debate since the 1861 discovery of Archaeopteryx. While a gliding type of flight appears to have matured earlier in evolutionary history, increasing evidence suggests that active flapping flight may have arisen without an intermediate gliding phase.
The lecture is 'Archaeopteryx: the story of an iconic fossil'.
During a field trip to the natural history museum, Kimmy is thrilled to share what she knows about the Stegosaurus and the Archaeopteryx and even the ginormous Titanosaurus.
Paleontologists in China have discovered a new species of fossil bird that they say reveals a pivotal point in the evolution of flight, when birds had lost the long bony tail seen in dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus and the early bird Archaeopteryx, but before they had developed the fan of feathers on a shortened tail seen in flying birds today, National Geographic reports.
While on her way to save her brother, Scotch, for example, watches in horror as Spot attacks an archaeopteryx. Faced with a wounded animal, Scotch calls on Baba Yaga to help save the injured creature.
Among the examples he used is the "Archaeopteryx," a fossil that many evolution theorists claimed represents a "missing link" or a "transitional fossil" --such fossils should be everywhere if evolution is true--between birds and reptiles.
"It is extremely similar to some early birds such as Archaeopteryx," said paleontologist Xing Xu of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, referring to the earliest-known bird, which lived 150 million years ago.
In the poem "Pristine Wing," Larrosa writes of the Archaeopteryx, "the oldest bird known to man," which "lived 150 million years ago" and, she asserts, still exists for us "in the armpits, in the big trees of the avenues, in the fine, caged homes, in the neighborhoods with ammunition in the gut ...
He pointed out that there is no record of this character state in the majority of modern birds, in fossil species, in Archaeopteryx, in Crocodylia, or in Coelurosauria.
My latest piece made especially for the Bangor exhibition is a large wall mounted Archaeopteryx (first bird) made entirely from 69 steel food cans.