archaic

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ar·cha·ic

 (är-kā′ĭk) also ar·cha·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. also Archaic Relating to, being, or characteristic of a much earlier, often more primitive period, especially one that develops into a classical stage of civilization: an archaic bronze statuette; Archaic Greece.
2. No longer current or applicable; antiquated: archaic laws. See Synonyms at old.
3. Relating to, being, or characteristic of words and language that were once in regular use but are now relatively rare and suggestive of an earlier style or period.
4.
a. Relating to or being an early or premodern evolutionary form of an organism or group of organisms: archaic vertebrates.
b. Relating to or being an early form of Homo sapiens or a closely related species, such as Neanderthal, that is anatomically distinct from modern humans.
5. Archaic Relating to a Native American culture prevalent throughout much of North America from about 8000 bc to about 1000 bc, characterized especially by the development of Mesolithic tools and by the increased reliance on smaller game animals as the large Pleistocene mammals became extinct.
n.
A member of an archaic population of Homo.

[Greek arkhāïkos, old-fashioned, from arkhaios, ancient, from arkhē, beginning, from arkhein, to begin.]

ar·cha′i·cal·ly adv.

archaic

(ɑːˈkeɪɪk)
adj
1. belonging to or characteristic of a much earlier period; ancient
2. out of date; antiquated: an archaic prison system.
3. (Linguistics) (of an idiom, vocabulary, etc) characteristic of an earlier period of a language and not in ordinary use
[C19: from French archaïque, from Greek arkhaïkos, from arkhaios ancient, from arkhē beginning, from arkhein to begin]
arˈchaically adv

ar•cha•ic

(ɑrˈkeɪ ɪk)

adj.
1. marked by the characteristics of an earlier period; antiquated: archaic ideas.
2. (of a linguistic form) commonly used in an earlier time but rare in present-day usage except to suggest an older time: used in this dictionary to indicate a word not current since c1900.
3. forming the earliest stage: an archaic period of technology.
4. primitive; ancient: an archaic form of animal life.
[1825–35; (< French) < Greek archaïkós antiquated, old-fashioned =archaî(os) old + -ikos -ic]
ar•cha′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.archaic - so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier periodarchaic - so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier period; "a ramshackle antediluvian tenement"; "antediluvian ideas"; "archaic laws"
old - of long duration; not new; "old tradition"; "old house"; "old wine"; "old country"; "old friendships"; "old money"
2.archaic - little evolved from or characteristic of an earlier ancestral typearchaic - little evolved from or characteristic of an earlier ancestral type; "archaic forms of life"; "primitive mammals"; "the okapi is a short-necked primitive cousin of the giraffe"
early - being or occurring at an early stage of development; "in an early stage"; "early forms of life"; "early man"; "an early computer"

archaic

adjective
1. old, ancient, antique, primitive, bygone, olden (archaic) archaic sculpture and porcelain
old new, present, recent, current, modern, contemporary
2. old-fashioned, obsolete, out of date, antiquated, outmoded, passé, old hat, behind the times, superannuated These archaic practices are advocated by people of limited outlook.
old-fashioned new, latest, modern, fresh, novel, with it (informal), up-to-date, state-of-the-art, up-to-the-minute, modish, newfangled

archaic

adjective
1. Belonging to, existing, or occurring in times long past:
2. Of a style or method formerly in vogue:
Translations
antiikkinenvanhahtava
gamaldags

archaic

[ɑːˈkeɪɪk] ADJarcaico

archaic

[ɑːrˈkeɪɪk] adj [law, practice, system, language, society] → archaïque

archaic

adj word etcveraltet, archaisch (spec); (inf: = ancient) → vorsintflutlich; my car is getting rather archaicmein Auto wird allmählich museumsreif

archaic

[ɑːˈkeɪɪk] adjarcaico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
And while some countries may insist, archaically, on restricting or censoring information, the future bends towards liberty.
I wanted to show the story as simply and archaically as possible.
Hollywood film/TV production is digital, but the back office remains archaically paper-centric, which is the rational for Entertainment Partners acquiring Ease Entertainment Services.
It might be possible to say, then, that Byron's political-aesthetic emphasis on whiteness, while seemingly archaically looking backward to a secularized form of race politics more reminiscent of the early modern age, demonstrates a point of blockage that haunts abolition, which insufficiently acknowledges the many limits of its vision.
The former is set in the pristine, manicured and archaically expansive suburbia of the late 1960s--the period of the Coens' own youth--while Llewyn is set in the early 1960s in the bohemian pre-Dylan Greenwich Village folk scene.
A "ligament" is at once the tough connective tissue which links our bones together and, archaically, a bond of union.
Underestimating the skills of clerk is not my objection but moral of lawyer while learning from clerk may archaically corrupts the morals, by getting the legal education and then coming to clerk demoralizes the most prestigious education and pin pointing the most sacred profession.
6) In his most notorious vilification of the effete bourgeoisie, Gold dismissed the work of Thornton Wilder as "a daydream of homosexual figures in graceful gowns moving archaically among the lilies" ("Wilder," 48).
Wurmser (2003) argues that the shame-based, guilt-ridden and pain-saturated aspects of self become the precursors for an archaically destructive superego.
3) Like the father, the priest is dressed not in his robe but in "an archaically conservative dark-gray suit whose boxy look might have been actual flannel" (215).