archaic

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ar·cha·ic

 (är-kā′ĭk) also ar·cha·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. also Archaic Relating to, being, or characteristic of a much earlier, often more primitive period, especially one that develops into a classical stage of civilization: an archaic bronze statuette; Archaic Greece.
2. No longer current or applicable; antiquated: archaic laws. See Synonyms at old.
3. Relating to, being, or characteristic of words and language that were once in regular use but are now relatively rare and suggestive of an earlier style or period.
4.
a. Relating to or being an early or premodern evolutionary form of an organism or group of organisms: archaic vertebrates.
b. Relating to or being an early form of Homo sapiens or a closely related species, such as Neanderthal, that is anatomically distinct from modern humans.
5. Archaic Relating to a Native American culture prevalent throughout much of North America from about 8000 bc to about 1000 bc, characterized especially by the development of Mesolithic tools and by the increased reliance on smaller game animals as the large Pleistocene mammals became extinct.
n.
A member of an archaic population of Homo.

[Greek arkhāïkos, old-fashioned, from arkhaios, ancient, from arkhē, beginning, from arkhein, to begin.]

ar·cha′i·cal·ly adv.

archaic

(ɑːˈkeɪɪk)
adj
1. belonging to or characteristic of a much earlier period; ancient
2. out of date; antiquated: an archaic prison system.
3. (Linguistics) (of an idiom, vocabulary, etc) characteristic of an earlier period of a language and not in ordinary use
[C19: from French archaïque, from Greek arkhaïkos, from arkhaios ancient, from arkhē beginning, from arkhein to begin]
arˈchaically adv

ar•cha•ic

(ɑrˈkeɪ ɪk)

adj.
1. marked by the characteristics of an earlier period; antiquated: archaic ideas.
2. (of a linguistic form) commonly used in an earlier time but rare in present-day usage except to suggest an older time: used in this dictionary to indicate a word not current since c1900.
3. forming the earliest stage: an archaic period of technology.
4. primitive; ancient: an archaic form of animal life.
[1825–35; (< French) < Greek archaïkós antiquated, old-fashioned =archaî(os) old + -ikos -ic]
ar•cha′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.archaic - so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier periodarchaic - so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier period; "a ramshackle antediluvian tenement"; "antediluvian ideas"; "archaic laws"
old - of long duration; not new; "old tradition"; "old house"; "old wine"; "old country"; "old friendships"; "old money"
2.archaic - little evolved from or characteristic of an earlier ancestral typearchaic - little evolved from or characteristic of an earlier ancestral type; "archaic forms of life"; "primitive mammals"; "the okapi is a short-necked primitive cousin of the giraffe"
early - being or occurring at an early stage of development; "in an early stage"; "early forms of life"; "early man"; "an early computer"

archaic

adjective
1. old, ancient, antique, primitive, bygone, olden (archaic) archaic sculpture and porcelain
old new, present, recent, current, modern, contemporary
2. old-fashioned, obsolete, out of date, antiquated, outmoded, passé, old hat, behind the times, superannuated These archaic practices are advocated by people of limited outlook.
old-fashioned new, latest, modern, fresh, novel, with it (informal), up-to-date, state-of-the-art, up-to-the-minute, modish, newfangled

archaic

adjective
1. Belonging to, existing, or occurring in times long past:
2. Of a style or method formerly in vogue:
Translations
antiikkinenvanhahtava
gamaldags

archaic

[ɑːˈkeɪɪk] ADJarcaico

archaic

[ɑːrˈkeɪɪk] adj [law, practice, system, language, society] → archaïque

archaic

adj word etcveraltet, archaisch (spec); (inf: = ancient) → vorsintflutlich; my car is getting rather archaicmein Auto wird allmählich museumsreif

archaic

[ɑːˈkeɪɪk] adjarcaico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Following up on the implications of this imagery and allusiveness, the present reading will argue that an important dimension of the novel exposes not only a particular move from archaically sanctified aggression toward a preference for devictimization, but that this cultural shift is best captured through studying the intriguing link between the sacred and the violent.
In this archaically geocentric image, the sun, whose rays are blocked from the earth by the ash cloud that has covered the planet and precipitated the death of its flora and fauna, endlessly "circles" the clouded sphere like a woman searching for a child now lost to her (28).
The primary cost, however, is in recoil, but there's no denying the smooth feeding of that archaically tapered .375 H&H case.
The state has not released any official figures, he says, but they "remain archaically stored in handwritten form." Ghali emphasized military courts are not assuming jurisdiction where they do not legally have it "it's simply that their jurisdiction [is] very wide."
"By means impossible to explain because of certain misconceptions in your model of reality all my mycelial networks in the galaxy are in hyperlight communication across space and time." The actual growing advice, however, is archaically complex (see: using agar, a growing medium common in labs but unnecessarily complicated for home mycologists).
JAMES'S Square, the books on World War II are somewhat archaically shelved under the classification "European War (II)." This was because when the Great War broke out in 1914, the librarian gave it the designation "European War." This was changed to "European War (I)" in 1939 when it became clear there was going to be another one, and the Library still hasn't gotten around to adopting the generally accepted modern titles for either war.
It was a pact, archaically inviolable and sacred to Medea (and the gods), and likely remains binding upon Jason: however, it would not have served as a marriage contract.
And while some countries may insist, archaically, on restricting or censoring information, the future bends towards liberty.
Archaically colonial, martial law is not an answer to the Moro problem.
In De Straat (The Street), 1972, a pumping soundscape with a mix of recognizable street noise, music, and a rather archaically literary voice-over accompanies breathtaking shots from a helicopter and acerbic jump cuts between street and market scenes in Belgium, Italy, and elsewhere--all as a way of commenting on an exhibition at the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, "De Straat.
"I wanted to show the story as simply and archaically as possible." That's what differentiates "Son of Saul" from scores of other Holocaust films over the decades.
Hollywood film/TV production is digital, but the back office remains archaically paper-centric, which is the rational for Entertainment Partners acquiring Ease Entertainment Services.