archaism


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Related to archaism: slovenliness

ar·cha·ism

 (är′kē-ĭz′əm, -kā-)
n.
1. An archaic word, phrase, idiom, or other expression.
2. An archaic style, quality, or usage.

[New Latin archaeismus, from Greek arkhaismos, from arkhaios, ancient; see archaic.]

ar′cha·ist n.
ar′cha·is′tic (-ĭs′tĭk) adj.

archaism

(ˈɑːkɪˌɪzəm; -keɪ-)
n
1. the adoption or imitation of something archaic, such as a word or an artistic or literary style
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an archaic word, expression, style, etc
[C17: from New Latin archaismus, from Greek arkhaïsmos, from arkhaizein to model one's style upon that of ancient writers; see archaic]
ˈarchaist n
ˌarchaˈistic adj

ar•cha•ism

(ˈɑr kiˌɪz əm, -keɪ-)

n.
1. an archaic verbal usage.
2. the use of archaic style or language.
3. the survival or presence of something from the past.
[1635–45; < New Latin, Latin archaismus < Greek archaïsmós. See archaic, -ism]
ar′cha•ist, n.
ar`cha•is′tic, adj.
ar′cha•ize`, v.t., v.i. -ized, -iz•ing.

archaism

a taste for and imitation of earlier styles, a recurrent phenomenon since ancient times based on the premise that earlier works were somehow purer and simpler. Cf. primitivism.
See also: Art
an inclination toward old-fashioned things, speech, etc. Also archaicism.archaist, n.archaic, adj.
See also: Past
an inclination toward old-fashioned things, speech, or actions, especially those of one’s ancestors. Also archaicism. — archaist, n. — archaistic, adj.
See also: Ancestors
the deliberate use, for effect, of old-fashioned terminology in literature.
See also: Language Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.archaism - the use of an archaic expression
ambages - (archaic) roundabout or mysterious ways of action
palfrey - especially a light saddle horse for a woman
gildhall - the meeting place of a medieval guild
hold - a stronghold
pibgorn, stockhorn, hornpipe - an ancient (now obsolete) single-reed woodwind; usually made of bone
complexion - (obsolete) a combination of elements (of dryness and warmth or of the four humors) that was once believed to determine a person's health and temperament
sooth - truth or reality; "in sooth"
muchness - greatness of quantity or measure or extent
fardel - a burden (figuratively in the form of a bundle)
alienism - an obsolete term for the study and treatment of mental illness
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"
the halt - (archaic) lame persons collectively; "the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind"--Luke 14:21
Negress - a Black woman or girl
colored, colored person - a United States term for Blacks that is now considered offensive
mulatto - an offspring of a black and a white parent
quadroon - an offspring of a mulatto and a white parent; a person who is one-quarter black
octoroon - an offspring of a quadroon and a white parent; a person who is one-eighth black
Oriental, oriental person - a member of an Oriental race; the term is regarded as offensive by Asians (especially by Asian Americans)
caitiff - a cowardly and despicable person
simple - any herbaceous plant having medicinal properties
meed - a fitting reward
bosom - the chest considered as the place where secret thoughts are kept; "his bosom was bursting with the secret"
air - once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles)
fire - once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles)
earth - once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles)
ether, quintessence - the fifth and highest element after air and earth and fire and water; was believed to be the substance composing all heavenly bodies
water - once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles)
menstruum - (archaic) a solvent
control - verify by using a duplicate register for comparison; "control an account"
compass - bring about; accomplish; "This writer attempts more than his talents can compass"
abide, bide, stay - dwell; "You can stay with me while you are in town"; "stay a bit longer--the day is still young"
commodious, convenient - large and roomy (`convenient' is archaic in this sense); "a commodious harbor"; "a commodious building suitable for conventions"
horary - relating to the hours; "the horary cycle"
meretricious - like or relating to a prostitute; "meretricious relationships"
apopemptic - addressed to one who is departing; "apopemptic hymns"
scriptural - written or relating to writing
empiric, empirical - relying on medical quackery; "empiric treatment"
hence - from this place; "get thee hence!"
away, forth, off - from a particular thing or place or position (`forth' is obsolete); "ran away from the lion"; "wanted to get away from there"; "sent the children away to boarding school"; "the teacher waved the children away from the dead animal"; "went off to school"; "they drove off"; "go forth and preach"
privily - confidentially or in secret; "told her friend privily that she was planning to be married"
brotherly - (archaic as adverb) in a brotherly manner
mellow, mellowly - (obsolete) in a mellow manner
by chance, perchance - through chance, "To sleep, perchance to dream.."
verily - in truth; certainly; "I verily think so"; "trust in the Lord...and verily thou shalt be fed"- Ps 37:3
imperativeness, instancy - the quality of being insistent; "he pressed his demand with considerable instancy"
Black person, blackamoor, Negro, Negroid, Black - a person with dark skin who comes from Africa (or whose ancestors came from Africa)
Translations

archaism

[ˈɑːkeɪɪzəm] Narcaísmo m

archaism

archaism

[ˈɑːkeɪɪzm] narcaismo
References in classic literature ?
The style in which it was written was that curious jewelled style, vivid and obscure at once, full of argot and of archaisms, of technical expressions and of elaborate paraphrases, that characterizes the work of some of the finest artists of the French school of Symbolistes.
Some of the specific peculiarities of this style are taken over, with exaggeration, from German usage; some are Biblical or other archaisms; others spring mainly from Carlyle's own amazing mind.
In her view, medieval Catholic baptism provides an excellent example of ritual archaism, in that, although used almost exclusively for infants, it was really for adults.
A lucid discussion of the 'populist archaism' of F.
This archaism matters, because Galbraith's continuing adherence to the primitive macroeconomics of his youth leaves him unprepared to confront the real dilemmas facing modern liberalism.
On its synonymity with esse, cf Munro on 1.119,`cluerent, a favourite archaism of Lucr.
"For in addition to deriving from the purest Spanish classicism, they are very beautiful, imbuing the subject with a special flavor of literary archaism which its nature requires by reason of its antiquity, nobility, exclusivity, and historic influence on the peninsula."
The form gradually disappeared among the poets, too, only to reappear spasmodically in the work of later writers as a conscious archaism.
My point is finally a simple one: in Sutpen's slaves Faulkner creates an anomalous archaism; they are historically free and yet doubly constrained, by a fiction (Absalom, Absalom!), and by a counter-revolutionary violence (Sutpen's) which is necessary to the workings of the plantation system.
understands that Luke wrote history as a man of his time, influenced by the techniques of archaism, speech composition, scenic condensation, commentative summaries, etc., which were cultivated amongst the epigones of Herodotus and Thucydides (both amply represented in the ancient-author index).
His later Rimskiye sonety ( Roman Sonnets ), written just before World War II, dispense with ornateness and archaism, achieving powerful effects in simple, direct lines.
Despite the authors' archaism of style and their tentative graps of anthropology and world history, Geurrero and Magon reveal a profound awareness of the need to examine and eliminate the personal and institutional underpinnings of sexism, if human liberation is to have meaning.