archconservative

arch·con·ser·va·tive

 (ärch′kən-sûr′və-tĭv)
adj.
Highly conservative, especially in political viewpoint.

arch′con·ser′va·tive n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Their father, Fred Koch, founded Koch Industries and built gas plants in Josef Stalin's Soviet Union before becoming an ardent anti-communist and a founder of the archconservative John Birch Society.
Leonard Feeney was an archconservative whose views were so extreme he was excommunicated in 1953.)
Even archconservative Mormon Utah recently passed a ballot measure legalizing medical marijuana, showing just how far public opinion has moved--though the state legislature is wisely replacing that measure with a version that imposes tighter regulations.
Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), an archconservative who opposed civil rights laws, and in the administrations of Presidents Reagan and George H.W.
People who, like me, watch KVAL news programs should be aware that this CBS affiliate has come under the control of an archconservative media conglomerate, Sinclair Broadcasting Group.
"Anyone appointed by a Democratic president is going to be much more liberal than the archconservative Justice Scalia.
But White took the late fundraising advantage, taking in about $45,000 in the first three weeks of January - bolstered by a $25,000 donation from archconservative group Empower Texans.
Only the archconservative daily Kayhan launched a direct attack on the deal.
Miller concludes on an optimistic note, quoting the pope as stating, "Women are asking deep questions that must be addressed." While affable and arguably far more progressive than his two predecessors (although the bar is low, as both of them were archconservative), he has shown no signs of understanding, much less accepting, women's full personhood.
The year is 1984; the archconservative Margaret Thatcher rules Britain with an iron fist and doesn't wear a velvet glove at all.
In 1964, Reagan cast his lot with archconservative Barry Goldwater, launching his own political career with a televised speech urging voters to choose the reactionary candidate who offered a clear view of a world divided between good guys and communists.
The principal men behind that prudent Peace of Paris (First and Second, the latter following Napoleon's return and defeat at Waterloo) were an archconservative, Prince Metternich, and a Burkean Whig, the British Foreign Minister Lord Castlereagh.