archfiend


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arch·fiend

 (ärch-fēnd′)
n.
1. A principal fiend.
2. Archfiend The Devil; Satan. Used with the.

archfiend

(ˌɑːtʃˈfiːnd)
n
(Theology) the archfiend (often capital) the chief of fiends or devils; Satan

arch•fiend

(ˈɑrtʃˈfind)

n.
1. a chief fiend.
2. Satan.
[1660–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

archfiend

noun
A perversely bad, cruel, or wicked person:
Translations

archfiend

n the archfiendder Erzfeind
References in classic literature ?
And then the subject became Religion, which was the Archfiend's deadliest weapon.
"To wrest your daughter and the wife of this royal warrior from the clutches of these archfiends you have but to command the resources of a mighty nation, for all Kaol is at your disposal.
Luther Link doesn't identify this as a typical feature of late ancient or medieval art (Luther Link, The Devil: The Archfiend in Art - from the Sixth to the Sixteenth Century [New York: Harry N.
The archfiend is joined by Lydia, a museum attendant whose yearning for fame leads her to surrender her soul to him, and the Shinto deity Kaya, who is looking for romantic love.
The full humanity the very first of us spat out, crying with Milton's archfiend, "To be weak is miserable," and then, later, "Better to reign in hell, than serve in heav'n."
Mark Roberts (Florence: Centro Di, 1997); Luther Link, The Devil: A Mask without a Face (London: Reaktion Books, 1995); and Link, Devil: The Archfiend in Art from the Sixth to the Sixteenth Century (New York: Harry N.
For "the archfiend whispered to [Dimmesdale] to condense into small compass and drop into her tender bosom a germ of evil that would be sure to blossom darkly soon, and bear black fruit betimes" (1:219-20).
Despite being fleetingly welcomed in by (blind) De Lacey, he is quickly cast out of 'the habitations of man' (414) by the jealous keepers of the (human) threshold; he seeks a hierogamy that will be nearly granted but ultimately denied him, and a recognition by his father-creator destined never to take place; as a result he too, refracting Milton, will identify with the Evil One ('Many times I considered Satan as the fitter emblem of my condition' [396]; 'I, like the archfiend, bore a hell within me' [403]; 'Evil [...] became my good' [493]); and he may interfere with, but never enter the human world.
Hilaire observes that "the medium of a question, which may imply an answer but which nevertheless does not itself declare one, opens up a gap in discursive logic wide enough for the Archfiend to slip through" (26).
The cruel, archfiend Sartael, supreme enemy of Satan, is defeated once and for all, and Atlanta is no longer the prime battleground for the forces of good and evil.
The "archfiend" dandelion, for example, is a dynamic accumulator of minerals from the subsoil, a nutritious green for people and livestock, and a pollen source that supports insect diversity.
Father Amorth claims he's dealt with a whopping 70,000 cases of demonic possession (can the archfiend multi-task?) and said the sex abuse scandals were proof that the anti-Christ was waging a war against the Holy See.