arginine


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Related to arginine: lysine

ar·gi·nine

 (är′jə-nēn′)
n.
An amino acid, C6H14N4O2, obtained from the hydrolysis or digestion of plant and animal protein.

[German Arginin, possibly from Greek arginoeis, bright; see arg- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

arginine

(ˈɑːdʒɪˌnaɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) an essential amino acid of plant and animal proteins, necessary for nutrition and for the production of excretory urea
[C19: from German Arginin, of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ar•gi•nine

(ˈɑr dʒəˌnin, -ˌnaɪn, -nɪn)

n.
an essential amino acid, C6H14N4O2: the free amino acid increases insulin secretion. Abbr.: Arg; Symbol: R
[1885–90; < German Arginin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·gi·nine

(är′jə-nēn′)
An essential amino acid. See more at amino acid.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arginine - a bitter tasting amino acid found in proteins and necessary for nutrition; its absence from the diet leads to a reduced production of spermatozoa
essential amino acid - an amino acid that is required by animals but that they cannot synthesize; must be supplied in the diet
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Arginin

arginine

n arginina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To validate whether TLC/FTIR technique is applicable to real chemical system, we used narrowband TLC plate to separate alanine and arginine. Subsequently, FTIR microscope with mapping techniques was used to reveal the distribution of colorless alanine and arginine band on the narrow band TLC plate.
In 1977 Griffith, Norms and Kagan (1, 2) discovered that if arginine was added to isolated HSV in a petri dish, the virus would multiply.
Core histones are rich in arginine and lysine, whereas somatic linker histones are rich in lysine.
James Russell, professor emeritus, Department of Surgery, Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases Laboratory at the Alberta Institute for Human Nutrition, University of Alberta, Canada and his colleagues conducted one of the preclinical studies, titled "Metabolic Effects of a Novel Silicate Inositol Complex of the Nitric Oxide Precursor Arginine in the Obese Insulin-resistant JCR: LA-cp Rat." Their research concluded that the arginine silicate inositol complex is absorbed efficiently, raising plasma arginine levels, and is more biologically effective than arginine hydrochloride.
Arginine (Arg) is one of the most important residues in catalytic centers of many enzymes.
Exhaled Nitric Oxide and Arginine Metabolism; Implications to Obesity and Asthma
Pegzilarginase is an enhanced human arginase that enzymatically depletes the amino acid arginine. Aeglea is developing pegzilarginase for the treatment of patients with Arginase 1 Deficiency, a rare debilitating disease of arginine metabolism presenting in childhood with persistent hyperargininemia, severe progressive neurological abnormalities and early mortality.
WiseGuyReports.com adds "Arginine Market 2018 Global Analysis, Growth, Trends and Opportunities Research Report Forecasting to 2023" reports to its database
Taurine and arginine are especially unique since they are only found in animal protein, which means meat.
Comment: In studies in mice, administration of a single large dose of arginine (500 mg per kg of body weight orally or 5 g per kg of body weight intraperitoneally) caused acute pancreatitis.
Consequently, tumour cells rely on the arginine supply in the bloodstream, a vulnerability that can be exploited therapeutically.