aristocratism

Related to aristocratism: aristocracy

aristocratism

(ˌærɪsˈtɒkrətɪzəm)
n
the principles of aristocrats the belief in aristocracy

aristocratism

the attitudes and actions of aristocrats.
See also: Society
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This "aristocratism" of jouissance, while not actually faithful to the work of Bataille and Lacan, has become a common image.
(74) The integration of the notion of an order of rank, which forms the internal scheme of Nietzsche's aristocratism, completes the elitist bias of Marsden's collapsing anarchism.
In Whitman's prose, democratic "commensurability" must constantly be challenged by "sameness" as well as "interchangeability" on a very fundamental, numerical level so as not to slip into a praxis that looks more like an aristocratism generated from constitutive differences in class, gender, or race.
The last chapter in the book is devoted to the "sociocultural features of early Russian liberalism": its aristocratism and defense of the nobility as a liberalizing social force; its aesthetics (Annenkov, Botkin, Druzhinin, Katkov); and its critics from right and left on the spectrum of Russian social thought.
It was this policy that the New Age positioned itself against, as indeed did Murry and Mansfield in Rhythm when they embraced aesthetic aristocratism and autonomy.
This type of system is distant from democratic and is considered "economic aristocratism." (3)
The section entitled "Tolstoy's Creative Work: Problematics and Poetics" includes an analysis of Tolstoy's novella Youth and his comedy The Nihilist, as well as a consideration of Tolstoy's aristocratism in the early diaries and his artistic whole as exemplified in his prose of the 1850s and 1860s.
His aristocratism "justifies itself in terms of an untenable naturalism," Keith Ansell-Pearson writes, and "stands or falls with the validity" of his assertion that exploitation is "the primordial fact of all history." (93) Philosophical naturalism, elevated to the status of a foundational myth and doctrine of violent necessity, is itself a metaphysical conceit, or what Milbank describes as a metanarrative of "ontological violence." The moment we deny Nietzsche the logical and historical self-evidence and necessity of these claims, then, we may also submit his aesthetic preferences to his own genealogical methods.
The lyrical writing of the romantic and the nostalgic has distinguished the Shanghai style from the didactic Peking style "equipped with modern western notions of historical progress." (46) Identifying Wang Anyi as a foremost exponent of the Shanghai school, David Wang points out that she has walked out of Eileen Chang's shadow in two steps: first, Wang Anyi tells the story of what happens to those pining young lovers in Chang's romances during the last half of their lifetime, offering a continuance of the Haipai fiction with a group of old-fashioned acquaintances as a living memory; second, she has replaced the aristocratism in Chang's writings with philistinism, remolding the Shanghai style of literature.
Les Meprisants, published in the following year, bears the traces of his Nietzschean aristocratism and his contempt for the masses: "Et ces hommes,--les poetes--vivant et mourant parmi le mepris des utilitaires, rudes pedants qui usurpaient un titre dont les meprises seuls etaient dignes [...]" (8).
His aristocratism and his particular views on governance were essentially those of the Chevaliers de la Foi, who constituted the rank and file of the parti ultraroyaliste.