ergometer

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er·gom·e·ter

 (ûr-gŏm′ĭ-tər)
n.
An instrument for measuring the amount of work done by a muscle or group of muscles.

[Greek ergon, work; see werg- in Indo-European roots + -meter.]

er′go·met′ric (ûr′gə-mĕt′rĭk) adj.

ergometer

(ɜːˈɡɒmɪtə)
n
1. (General Physics) a dynamometer
2. (Rowing) Also called: erg (informal) or ergo a type of exercise machine in which the action of rowing is simulated by the pulling of a strong flexible cord wound round a flywheel
[C20: from Greek ergon work + -meter]

er•gom•e•ter

(ɜrˈgɒm ɪ tər)

n.
a device for measuring the physiological effects of a period of work or exercise, as calories expended while bicycling.
[1875–80]
er`go•met′ric (-gəˈmɛ trɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ergometer - measuring instrument designed to measure powerergometer - measuring instrument designed to measure power
measuring device, measuring instrument, measuring system - instrument that shows the extent or amount or quantity or degree of something
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Alternative exercises included walking without pain, arm ergometer (an exercise bike for the arms), resistance training, circuit training, lower limb aerobic exercise, and walking with poles.
Thus, the purposes of present study were 1) to compare rest QT and QTc intervals in trained men with and without cervical SCI and, 2) to investigate cardiac ECG parameters in trained men with cervical SCI submitted to a maximal arm ergometer test.
"Once you are able to do some more intense exercise, the best thing out there is the arm ergometer," Lee says.
Subjects were between 18 and 65 yr old, used manual wheelchairs as a primary mean of mobility, had an SCI, were at least 6 mo postinjury, and were able to use an arm ergometer for exercise.
On an arm ergometer test, nearly one in four healthy persons with paraplegia fail to achieve VO2 levels required to perform many of the essential activities of daily living (Noreau et al 1993).
(2004) Comparison between the use of saliva and blood for the minimum lactate determination in arm ergometer and cycle ergometer in table tennis players.