army ant


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Related to army ant: driver ant

army ant

n.
Any of various tropical ants that hunt live prey in columns or swarms. Also called legionary ant.

army ant

n
(Animals) any of various mainly tropical American predatory ants of the subfamily Dorylinae, which live in temporary nests and travel in vast hordes preying on other animals. Also called: legionary ant See also driver ant

ar′my ant`


n.
any of various chiefly tropical ants of the subfamily Dorylinae, traveling in vast swarms and preying mainly on other insects. Also called driver ant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.army ant - tropical nomadic ant that preys mainly on other insectsarmy ant - tropical nomadic ant that preys mainly on other insects
ant, emmet, pismire - social insect living in organized colonies; characteristically the males and fertile queen have wings during breeding season; wingless sterile females are the workers
References in periodicals archive ?
With more than 500,000 ant sisters migrating, raiding, and even reproducing as one superorganism, an army ant colony appears to Mona as the paragon of successful social existence.
They live exclusively among one species of army ant, Eciton mexicanum.
A new study, co-authored by Simon Garnier, director of the Swarm Lab at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, has helped shed light not only on how an army ant colony builds bridges, but also how they may even opt to build bridges themselves.
It was terrifying - and certainly wasn't on the health and safety form!' Among the other highlights of this remarkable series are Bengal tiger hunts and going inside army ant colonies.
Think cameras rigged to elephants to film Bengal tiger hunts, HD helicopter cams capturing wild dogs running at 37mph and minuscule cameras on lightweight cranes raiding army ant colonies.
Kronauer, "Recent advances in army ant biology (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)," Myrmecological News, vol.
Evolution of the army ant syndrome: The origin and long-term evolutionary stasis of a complex of behavioral and reproductive adaptations.
Colony size ranges from a few individuals to over a million in some leaf-cutting and army ant species to hundreds of millions in some species with supercolonies (Bourke, 1999).
Researchers from Brazil and England studied a type of army ant that hunts for food during the day.
"As trivial as pothole plugging may seem, Powell and Franks have empirically demonstrated how such behavior can contribute to colony fitness, and that makes it important," comments army ant specialist William Gotwald Jr.

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