arose


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a·rose

 (ə-rōz′)
v.
Past tense of arise.

arose

(əˈrəʊz)
vb
the past tense of arise

a•rise

(əˈraɪz)

v.i. a•rose, a•ris•en (əˈrɪz ən)
a•ris•ing.
1. to get up from sitting, lying, or kneeling; rise: He arose from his chair.
2. to awaken; wake up.
3. to move upward; ascend.
4. to appear; spring up: New problems arise daily.
5. to result; spring or issue (sometimes fol. by from): the consequences arising from this action.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English ārīsan, c. Gothic urreisan. See a-3, rise]
References in classic literature ?
But when the pride of their strength arose they shook the hills with their heels.
A hundred voices at once arose, a hundred harps were strung.
When discord arose, then the two races were drawn different ways: the iron and brass fell to acquiring money and land and houses and gold and silver; but the gold and silver races, not wanting money but having the true riches in their own nature, inclined towards virtue and the ancient order of things.
Considering the difficulties which men have had to hold to a newly acquired state, some might wonder how, seeing that Alexander the Great became the master of Asia in a few years, and died whilst it was scarcely settled (whence it might appear reasonable that the whole empire would have rebelled), nevertheless his successors maintained themselves, and had to meet no other difficulty than that which arose among themselves from their own ambitions.
Hence arose those frequent rebellions against the Romans in Spain, France, and Greece, owing to the many principalities there were in these states, of which, as long as the memory of them endured, the Romans always held an insecure possession; but with the power and long continuance of the empire the memory of them passed away, and the Romans then became secure possessors.
We must suppose, then, that Socrates's mistake arose from the principle he set out with being false; we admit, indeed, that both a family and a city ought to be one in some particulars, but not entirely; for there is a point beyond which if a city proceeds in reducing itself to one, it will be no longer a city.
And now, at a signal from Ozma, the Woggle-Bug arose and addressed the jury.
The Princess was just about to order Eureka's head chopped off with the Tin Woodman's axe when that brilliant personage once more arose and addressed her.
A dog that had been sleeping in the roadway arose and barked.