arpent


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ar·pent

 (är-päN′)
n.
Any of various French units of land measurement, especially one used in parts of Canada and the southern United States and equal to about 0.4 hectare (0.85 acre).

[French, from Old French, from Latin arepennis, half acre; see per in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

arpent

(ˈɑːpənt; French arpɑ̃) or

arpen

n
1. (Units) a former French unit of length equal to 190 feet (approximately 58 metres)
2. (Units) an old French unit of land area equal to about one acre: still used in Quebec and Louisiana
[C16: from Old French, probably from Late Latin arepennis half an acre, of Gaulish origin; related to Middle Irish airchenn unit of land measure]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ar•pent

(ˈɑr pənt; Fr. arˈpɑ̃)

n., pl. -pents (-pənts; Fr. -ˈpɑ̃)
an old French unit of area equal to about one acre (0.4 hectare), still used in the province of Quebec and in parts of Louisiana.
[1570–80; < Middle French < Latin arepennis half-acre < Gaulish]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arpent - a former French unit of area; equal approximately to an acre
area unit, square measure - a system of units used to measure areas
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Le petit arpent du bon Dieu." Arts 691 (8-14 October 1958), p.
(75) Equally pertinent is the dispatch of 26 May 1742, to Beauharnois wherein Father Claude-Godefroy Coquart reported that a war party of Cree and Assiniboine had recently routed the Sioux of the prairies in a four-day battle, killed seventy men besides women and children, and captured such a large number of slaves that they made a line four arpents long.
Watkins (Ed.), ARPENT: Annual review of progress in entrepreneurship (pp.