arrogance


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ar·ro·gance

 (ăr′ə-gəns)
n.
The state or quality of being arrogant; overbearing pride.

ar•ro•gance

(ˈær ə gəns)

n.
offensive display of superiority or self-importance; overbearing pride; haughtiness.
Sometimes, ar′ro•gan•cy.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Middle French < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arrogance - overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiorsarrogance - overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiors
superbia, pride - unreasonable and inordinate self-esteem (personified as one of the deadly sins)
condescension, disdainfulness, superciliousness - the trait of displaying arrogance by patronizing those considered inferior
contemptuousness - the manifestation of scorn and contempt; "every subordinate sensed his contemptuousness and hated him in return"
hubris - overbearing pride or presumption
domineeringness, imperiousness, overbearingness - the trait of being imperious and overbearing
superiority - displaying a sense of being better than others; "he hated the white man's superiority and condescension"
snobbery, snobbishness, snobbism - the trait of condescending to those of lower social status

arrogance

arrogance

noun
Translations
عَجْرَفَه، غَطْرَسَه، عَنْجَهِيَّه
arogancedomýšlivost
arrogancehovmodighed
arogancija
hroki
arogancia
nadutostoholost
arrogans
kibirkendini beğenmişlik

arrogance

[ˈærəgəns] Narrogancia f, prepotencia f (esp LAm)

arrogance

[ˈærəgəns] narrogance f

arrogance

nArroganz f, → Überheblichkeit f

arrogance

[ˈærəgəns] narroganza

arrogant

(ˈӕrəgənt) adjective
extremely proud; thinking that one is much more important than other people.
ˈarrogantly adverb
ˈarrogance noun
References in classic literature ?
How are you getting on in these hard times?' The fox, full of all kinds of arrogance, looked at the cat from head to foot, and for a long time did not know whether he would give any answer or not.
The girl thought the arrogance and granite-heartedness of the magnate of the play was very accurately drawn.
Extraordinary, stiff-backed, thin figure all in black, the observed of all, while walking hand-in-hand with the girl; apparently shy, but--and here Fyne came very near showing something like insight--probably nursing under a diffident manner a considerable amount of secret arrogance. Mrs.
The unfortunate queen Pomare, incapable of averting the impending calamity, terrified at the arrogance of the insolent Frenchman, and driven at last to despair, fled by night in a canoe to Emio.
He wanted to marry well, and having the arrogance to raise his eyes to her, pretended to be in love; but she was perfectly easy as to his not suffering any disappointment that need be cared for.
He was regarded by boys and masters with a vague dislike, and it was from arrogance that Philip now sought his society.
In her absurd mood of lustful arrogance, Mary looked at the little figures and thought, "If I liked I could make you go in there or stop short; I could make you walk in single file or in double file; I could do what I liked with you." Then Mrs.
His bearing at this time too largely reflected the less pleasant side of his nature, especially his pride and arrogance. Yet toward professed inferiors he could be kind; and real playfulness and tenderness, little evident in most of his other writings, distinguish his
They were as little children before Ahab; and yet, in Ahab, there seemed not to lurk the smallest social arrogance. With one mind, their intent eyes all fastened upon the old man's knife, as he carved the chief dish before him.
I cannot help suspending my narration to reflect a little on the ridiculous speculations of those swelling philosophers, whose arrogance would prescribe laws to nature, and subject those astonishing effects, which we behold daily, to their idle reasonings and chimerical rules.
"Art thou come, by chance, cruel basilisk of these mountains, to see if in thy presence blood will flow from the wounds of this wretched being thy cruelty has robbed of life; or is it to exult over the cruel work of thy humours that thou art come; or like another pitiless Nero to look down from that height upon the ruin of his Rome in embers; or in thy arrogance to trample on this ill-fated corpse, as the ungrateful daughter trampled on her father Tarquin's?
"From the very beginning-- from the first moment, I may almost say-- of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry."