Articular cartilage


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Related to Articular cartilage: hyaline cartilage
cartilage that lines the joints.

See also: Cartilage

References in periodicals archive ?
Once a portion of the meniscus is removed, the articular cartilage can experience excessive stress which may lead to arthritic changes and the onset of osteoarthritis (OA).
Objective: Adult articular cartilage has a limited capacity for repair so when damaged it can lead to joint degeneration and ultimately osteoarthritis.
Articular cartilage consists of an extracellular matrix (ECM) (95%) and a sparse population of chondrocytes (5%).
Multiple studies have been conducted with the objective of repairing articular cartilage lesions in symptomatic patients.
Reports on the influence of immobilization on the articular cartilage thickness are controversial.
Several human studies have been done using bone marrow and fat stem cells for articular cartilage lesions.
However, if the lesion is small with intact articular cartilage, the bone scan normal, and your symptoms minor, then the real value of the procedure is less evident.
Ossur recently announced the launch of Rebound Cartilage, a brace designed to provide unicompartmental load reduction and range of movement restriction after articular cartilage defect procedures.
The same engineered grafts are currently being tested in a parallel study for articular cartilage repair in the knee.
Articular cartilage is the tissue on the ends of bones where they meet at joints in the body - including in the knees, shoulders and hips.
Stem cell researchers from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research report they have published the first study to identify the origin cells and track early development of human articular cartilage, providing what could be a new cell source and biological roadmap for therapies to repair cartilage defects and osteoarthritis.
Articular cartilage injury of the knee; basic science to surgical repair.