articular

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ar·tic·u·lar

 (är-tĭk′yə-lər)
adj.
Of or relating to a joint or joints: the articular surfaces of bones.

[Middle English articuler, from Latin articulāris, from articulus, small joint; see article.]

ar·tic′u·lar·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

articular

(ɑːˈtɪkjʊlə)
adj
(Anatomy) of or relating to joints or to the structural components in a joint
[C15: from Latin articulāris concerning the joints, from articulus small joint; see article]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ar•tic•u•lar

(ɑrˈtɪk yə lər)

adj.
of or pertaining to the joints.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin articulāris; see article, -ar1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.articular - relating to or affecting the joints of the bodyarticular - relating to or affecting the joints of the body; "the articular surfaces of bones"; "articular disease"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ar·tic·u·lar

a. articular, rel. a las articulaciones.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

articular

adj articular
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The GLIDER[TM] Articular Cartilage Probe is a minimally invasive device for treating articular cartilage disease. The GLIDER probe's proprietary design features a pivoting head that emits radiofrequency (RF) energy as it follows the contoured surfaces of the joint.
* MR studies can document the events and timeline leading from injury to articular cartilage disease.