incubation

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in·cu·ba·tion

 (ĭn′kyə-bā′shən, ĭng′-)
n.
1.
a. The act of incubating.
b. The state of being incubated.
2. Medicine The development of an infection from the time the pathogen enters the body until signs or symptoms first appear.
3. Medicine The maintenance of an infant, especially a premature infant, in an environment of controlled temperature, humidity, and oxygen concentration in order to provide optimal conditions for growth and development.

in′cu·ba′tion·al adj.

in•cu•ba•tion

(ˌɪn kyəˈbeɪ ʃən, ˌɪŋ-)

n.
1. the act or process of incubating.
2. the state of being incubated.
3. the period between the initial infection and the appearance of symptoms of a disease.
[1605–15; < Latin]
incubate, incubation - Latin incubare, the source of incubate, literally meant "lie down on"; incubation once had the sense of sleeping in a sacred place or temple for oracular purposes.
See also related terms for sleeping.

incubation

1. The inducement of dreams.
2. Keeping eggs or embryos warm (e.g. by sitting on them) in preparation for hatching.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incubation - maintaining something at the most favorable temperature for its developmentincubation - maintaining something at the most favorable temperature for its development
care, tending, attention, aid - the work of providing treatment for or attending to someone or something; "no medical care was required"; "the old car needs constant attention"
2.incubation - (pathology) the phase in the development of an infection between the time a pathogen enters the body and the time the first symptoms appear
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
infection - the pathological state resulting from the invasion of the body by pathogenic microorganisms
phase, stage - any distinct time period in a sequence of events; "we are in a transitional stage in which many former ideas must be revised or rejected"
3.incubation - sitting on eggs so as to hatch them by the warmth of the bodyincubation - sitting on eggs so as to hatch them by the warmth of the body
birthing, giving birth, parturition, birth - the process of giving birth
Translations
حِضانَه، إحْتِضان
inkubace
inkubationinkubationstid
kiköltésköltéslappangás
klak; meîgöngutími sóttar
inkubácia
kuluçkaya yatma

incubation

[ˌɪnkjʊˈbeɪʃən]
A. N [of egg, disease] → incubación f
B. CPD incubation period Nperíodo m de incubación

incubation

[ˌɪnkjʊˈbeɪʃən] n
[egg] → incubation f
[disease, germ, virus] → incubation fincubation period npériode f d'incubation

incubation

n (of egg, fig: of plan) → Ausbrüten nt; (of bacteria)Züchten nt

incubation

[ˌɪnkjʊˈbeɪʃn] nincubazione f

incubate

(ˈiŋkjubeit) verb
1. to produce (young birds) from eggs by sitting on them or by keeping them warm by some other means.
2. (of germs or disease) to develop until signs of the disease appear. How long does chickenpox take to incubate?
ˌincuˈbation noun
ˈincubator noun
a heated box-like apparatus for hatching eggs or a similar one for rearing premature babies etc.

in·cu·ba·tion

n. incubación.
1. período de latencia de una enfermedad antes de manifestarse;
2. mantenimiento de un ambiente especial ajustado a las necesidades de recién nacidos, esp. prematuros;
___ periodperíodo de ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to boost the incubation rate of the African penguin, the zoo began applying artificial incubation of penguin eggs in 2016 during early stages.
the Egyptians discovered the technique of artificial incubation.
In 2008, the Pcaarrd reported that with documentation and studies, the technologies of breaking broodiness in native chicken, as well as artificial incubation and brooding were found to double egg and day-old chick production.
Semi-intensive ostrich production system that optimises reproductive performance requires the artificial incubation of the eggs as a technique to produce viable chicks (Burger and Bertram,1981; Deeming, 1995a; Cooper, 2001).
Previous studies have mentioned the advantages of artificial incubation, such as to prevent predation (Joanen, 1969; Pooley, 1973; Chabreck, 1978), create the best conditions for embryonic development (Joanen and McNeese, 1977; Chabreck, 1978) and protect the egg from flooding (Jimenez-Oraa et al.
The captive breeding programme involves using artificial insemination (as natural breeding is a rare occurrence in caged Houbara Bustards) and artificial incubation of the eggs.
ABSTRACT In artificial incubation of astacid crayfish eggs, stage 2 juveniles must be removed by hand from incubators and a significant decrease in survival rates has been recorded between hatching (stage 1) and the first moult (stage 2).
Key words: embryo, heart rate, digital egg monitor, artificial incubation, avian, chicken, turkey, birds of prey, peregrine falcon, Falco peregrinus, Northern goshawk, Accipiter gentilis
The methodology that was used resulted in the first successful artificial incubation, hatching, and rearing of a Drepanidinae.
When this egg was removed for artificial incubation, Tama laid a second egg.
That first egg is sent off for artificial incubation and rearing by zookeepers with condor-like puppets as parental stand-ins.

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