ascending


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as·cend·ing

 (ə-sĕn′dĭng)
adj.
1. Moving, going, or growing upward: an ascending minor scale.
2. Moving or progressing toward a higher level or degree: an ascending order of difficulty.
3. Botany Growing or directing upward from a curved or slanted base, as certain plant stems.

as·cend′ing·ly adv.

ascending

(əˈsɛndɪŋ)
adj
1. moving upwards; rising
2. (Botany) botany sloping or curving upwards: the ascending stem of a vine.

as•cend•ing

(əˈsɛn dɪŋ)

adj.
1. moving upward; rising.
2. Bot. growing or directed upward.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ascending - the act of changing location in an upward directionascending - the act of changing location in an upward direction
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
levitation - the act of raising (a body) from the ground by presumably spiritualistic means
heave, heaving - the act of lifting something with great effort
mount, climb - the act of climbing something; "it was a difficult climb to the top"
soar, zoom - the act of rising upward into the air
Adj.1.ascending - moving or going or growing upwardascending - moving or going or growing upward; "the ascending plane"; "the ascending staircase"; "the ascending stems of chickweed"
up - being or moving higher in position or greater in some value; being above a former position or level; "the anchor is up"; "the sun is up"; "he lay face up"; "he is up by a pawn"; "the market is up"; "the corn is up"
descending - coming down or downward
Translations

ascending

[əˈsendiŋ] ADJascendente
in ascending orderen orden ascendente

ascending

[əˈsɛndɪŋ] adj [spiral, scale] → croissant(e)
in ascending order → par ordre croissant
in ascending order of importance → par ordre d'importance croissante
in ascending order of cost
This brochure lists the hotels in ascending order of cost → Ce prospectus donne une liste des hôtels, du plus économique au plus cher.

ascending

[əˈsɛndɪŋ] adjascendente

ascending

adj ascendente
References in classic literature ?
Thus spake Zarathustra to himself while ascending, comforting his heart with harsh maxims: for he was sore at heart as he had never been before.
These vanes were four in number, but were found entirely ineffectual in moving the balloon, or in aiding its ascending power.
"As soon as the balloon quits the earth, it is subjected to the influence of many circumstances tending to create a difference in its weight ; augmenting or diminishing its ascending power.
Found the ascending force greater than we had expected ; and as we arose higher and so got clear of the cliffs, and more in the sun's rays, our ascent became very rapid.
He made the tour of the church twenty times, length and breadth, up and down, ascending and descending, running, calling, sbouting, peeping, rummaging, ransacking, thrusting his head into every hole, pushing a torch under every vault, despairing, mad.
Quasimodo ascended the tower staircase for the sake of ascending it, for the sake of seeing why the priest was ascending it.
For example, I am ascending; now I can see your neighbour the Hexagon and his family in their several apartments; now I see the inside of the Theatre, ten doors off, from which the audience is only just departing; and on the other side a Circle in his study, sitting at his books.
As to the possibility of ascending by this ladder, passing over the roofs of the houses, passing back, and descending again, unobserved-- it is discovered, on the evidence of the night policeman, that he only passes through Shore Lane twice in an hour, when out on his beat.
With a rueful visage I now bethought me of the scanty handful of bread I had stuffed into the bosom of my frock, and felt somewhat desirous to ascertain what part of it had weathered the rather rough usage it had experienced in ascending the mountain.
These discoveries immediately determined us to abandon a place which had presented no inducement for us to remain, except the promise of security; and as we looked about us for the means of ascending again into the upper regions, we at last found a practicable part of the rock, and half an hour's toil carried us to the summit of the same cliff from which the preceding evening we had descended.
With this view, after exploring without success a little glen near us, we crossed several of the ridges of which I have before spoken; and about noon found ourselves ascending a long and gradually rising slope, but still without having discovered any place adapted to our purpose.
I soon reached him and presently we were both ascending the long ladder toward the opening above.