ascorbic acid


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Related to ascorbic acid: citric acid

a·scor·bic acid

 (ə-skôr′bĭk)
n.
A water-soluble vitamin, C6H8O6, found in fruits, potatoes, peppers, and leafy green vegetables or produced synthetically. A deficiency of ascorbic acid causes scurvy. Also called vitamin C.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ascorbic acid

(əˈskɔːbɪk)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a white crystalline vitamin present in plants, esp citrus fruits, tomatoes, and green vegetables. A deficiency in the diet of man leads to scurvy. Formula: C6H8O6. Also called: vitamin C
[C20 ascorbic from a-1 + scorb(ut)ic]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•scor′bic ac′id

(əˈskɔr bɪk)
n.
a white, crystalline, water-soluble vitamin, C6H8O6, occurring naturally in citrus fruits, green vegetables, etc., and also produced synthetically, essential for normal metabolism: used in the prevention and treatment of scurvy, and in wound-healing and tissue repair. Also called vitamin C.
[1930–35; a-6 + scorb(ut)ic]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·scor·bic acid

(ə-skôr′bĭk)
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ascorbic acid - a vitamin found in fresh fruits (especially citrus fruits) and vegetablesascorbic acid - a vitamin found in fresh fruits (especially citrus fruits) and vegetables; prevents scurvy
antioxidant - substance that inhibits oxidation or inhibits reactions promoted by oxygen or peroxides
water-soluble vitamin - any vitamin that is soluble in water
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
askorbinsyre
askorbiinhape
askorbiinihappo
askorbinsyra

ascorbic acid

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ascorbic acid

[əˌskɔːbɪkˈæsɪd] nacido ascorbico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

a·scor·bic ac·id

n. ácido ascórbico, vitamina C.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ascorbic acid

n ácido ascórbico
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The key factor restraining the global ethyl ascorbic acid market is an adverse effect of ethyl ascorbic acids such as loosening, peeling, and blistering of the skin, joint, muscle, and bone pain.
Summary: The photochemical study for oxidation of ascorbic acid with methylene green was studied in aqueous and aqueous methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol at temperature ranges from 303 - 318 K in acidic medium.
Summary: The global ascorbic acid market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 5.1% between 2018 and 2028
We've learned from other scientific endeavors that ionizing radiation can induce the formation of furan in solutions of simple sugars and ascorbic acid.
The treatments consisted of osmotic dehydration with sucrose solution at concentrations of 60% and 80% for two hours, followed by addition of one of the preserving ingredients: citric acid, ascorbic acid or pectin.
During hot climates, the supplementation of extra electrolytes or vitamins such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) to the drinking water or feed of poultry has become a common practice.
Mango fruits were stored at 5, 10 and 15 +- 1 AdegC for 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 days and evaluated for weight loss (%), fruit juice pH, ascorbic acid, chilling injury score and ion leakage (%) after completion of the respective storage period.
These may be natural as ascorbic acid, [alpha]-tocopherol, phenolic compounds among others or may be synthetic as butyl hydroxytoluene (BHT), butyl hydroxyanisole (BHA), propyl gallate (PG) and tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) [2, 14-15].
The leaf extracts were administered to two different groups, 1 g/kg BW and 3 g/kg BW, positive control received ascorbic acid, while negative control and sham group were administered with sterile water.
Here we present a case of marked interference with FSBG readings due to intravenous ascorbic acid.