ascot

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As·cot

 (ăs′kət)
A village of south-central England west of London. The Royal Ascot horseraces, initiated by Queen Anne in 1711, are held annually in June on Ascot Heath.

as·cot

 (ăs′kət, -kŏt′)
n.
A broad neck scarf knotted so that its ends lie flat, one upon the other.

[After the racetrack near Ascot.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ascot

(ˈæskət)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a cravat with wide square ends, usually secured with an ornamental stud
[C20: named after Ascot, where it was probably first worn]

Ascot

(ˈæskət)
n
(Placename) a town in S England, in Bracknell Forest unitary authority, Berkshire: noted for its horse-race meetings, esp Royal Ascot, a four-day meeting held in June. Pop: 8755 (2001)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

as•cot

(ˈæs kət, -kɒt)

n.
a tie or scarf with broad ends looped to lie flat one upon the other and sometimes held with a pin.
[1905–10; so called from the fashionable dress worn at the Ascot races]

As•cot

(ˈæs kət)

n.
a village in SE Berkshire, in S England: annual horse races.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ascot - a cravat with wide square ends; secured with an ornamental pin
cravat - neckwear worn in a slipknot with long ends overlapping vertically in front
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"One must be smart at Ascot," she answered, "or stay away."
I don't even know where to get flowers for dinner tonight or where to go for my Ascot gowns.
You remember how anxious she was to have a boy, and it was a boy, but it died, and her husband died shortly afterwards, and she married almost immediately one of Lord Ascot's sons, who, I am told, beats her.
Royal Ascot is almost upon us, so you might be wondering: 'how do I get to the racecourse?'