ascription

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as·crip·tion

 (ə-skrĭp′shən)
n.
1. The act of ascribing.
2. A statement that ascribes.

[Latin ascrīptiō, ascrīptiōn-, addendum, from ascrīptus, past participle of ascrībere, to ascribe; see ascribe.]

as·crip′tive adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ascription

(əˈskrɪpʃən) or

adscription

n
1. the act of ascribing
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a statement ascribing something to someone, esp praise to God
[C16: from Latin ascrīptiō, from ascrībere to ascribe]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

as•crip•tion

(əˈskrɪp ʃən)

n.
1. the act of ascribing.
2. a statement ascribing something, esp. praise to the Deity.
[1590–1600; < Latin ascrīptiō a written addition. See ascribe, -tion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ascription - assigning some quality or character to a person or thing; "the attribution of language to birds"; "the ascription to me of honors I had not earned"
categorisation, categorization, sorting, classification - the basic cognitive process of arranging into classes or categories
zoomorphism - the attribution of animal forms or qualities to a god
2.ascription - assigning to a cause or source; "the attribution of lighting to an expression of God's wrath"; "he questioned the attribution of the painting to Picasso"
categorisation, categorization, sorting, classification - the basic cognitive process of arranging into classes or categories
animatism - the attribution of consciousness and personality to natural phenomena such as thunderstorms and earthquakes and to objects such as plants and stones
imputation - the attribution to a source or cause; "the imputation that my success was due to nepotism meant that I was not taken seriously"
externalisation, externalization - attributing to outside causes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

ascription

noun
The act of attributing:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

ascription

[əˈskrɪpʃən] Natribución f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ascription

nZuschreibung f; difficulties arising from the ascription of emotions to animalsSchwierigkeiten, die sich ergeben, wenn man Tieren Gefühle zuschreibt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Never can love make consciousness and ascription equal in force.
In three of the smaller collections (Copenhagen, Wolfenbuttel, and Leuven) such ascriptions are missing entirely, and in the others, the names of composers appear only sporadically.
His proposed reduction of arithmetic to a theory of logical operations was conceived as an alternative to the set-theoretic reductions of Frege and Russell, which are based on an analysis of the extra-mathematical use of number signs in number ascriptions.
By taking this functional, 'ontologically neutral' approach, we are more able to facilitate our clients' direct altering of their own 'worlding' process and hence the resultant collection of ascriptions, meanings and behaviours that emerge from a given worldview (Nelson and Howell, 1993-4).
In this paper, the author offers a novel account of knowledge ascriptions with concealed questions as complements (for example, "Amy knows the capital of Vermont").
Among the topics are Kripke's G|del case, testing theories of reference, a Rylian argument against reference, the metaphilosophy of language, experimental semantics: the case of natural kind terms, ambiguity and referential machinery, a discussion of some experimental results, and testing transparent ascriptions: a plea for an experimental approach.
This Article describes a new model of the relationship between racial ascriptions on an individual level, private racial bias, social disadvantage, and state action, called the cognitive hierarchical model.
'Struggles over encompassment' (Chapter 4) focuses on genealogies and their importance for both records of social distinction and the establishment of histories of connectivities during a period when old ascriptions (such as 'noble') are losing their importance and are increasingly being replaced by modern ascriptions (such as 'white-skinned').
This novel identity or, better, the presence of place, I wish to describe and understand as a precarious presence, as an "unsecured" state involving a constant oscillation between ascriptions and identities that are too difficult to come to terms with.
For spatial and temporal judgments the ascriptions of the relevant nominal terms can be judged.
Similarly, 11 of the 25 participants who initially ascribed to an associative pathway had changed their pathway ascriptions to either a different associative category or to a non-associative pathway after one year.