ashcan


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Related to ashcan: Ashcan school

ash·can

or ash can  (ăsh′kăn′)
n.
1. A large, usually metal receptacle for trash.
2. Slang A depth charge.
3. Slang A powerful cylindrical firecracker.

ashcan

(ˈæʃˌkæn)
n
a US word for dustbin Also called: garbage can, ash bin or trash can

ash′can`

or ash′ can`,



n.
1. a large metal barrel, can, or similar receptacle for ashes or refuse.
2. Slang. a depth charge.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ashcan - a bin that holds rubbish until it is collectedashcan - a bin that holds rubbish until it is collected
bin - a container; usually has a lid
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
For coaxing enemy subs to the surface (or sending them to the bottom), she had ashcan depth-charge racks plus depthcharge projectors.
In her early adherence to figuration over abstract tendencies, Bernstein set on a path parallel to her many contemporary urban Realists on the New York scene--primarily those associated with "the Eight" or the Ashcan School, including Robert Henri, John Sloan, William Glackens, George Luks, and Everett Shinn, as well as other early modernists such as Edward Hopper and her close friend, Stuart Davis.
But oil painting was his "first love," and by 1903 he was pursuing it at the New York School of Art, where he encountered both the elegant William Merritt Chase and the raw Robert Henri of the art-for-the-masses Ashcan School.
It was carried on in America by the Ashcan school, which included such artists as George Bellows, Robert Henri, and Edward Hopper.
Coming from the urban realism of The Ashcan School, my newest portfolio works to move my inner vision of the world around me into reality; to make the invisible visible.
The Allies held elite Nazis in two luxurious locales: the Palace Hotel in Luxembourg, renamed "Ashcan," and Crane Mountain Castle in Hesse, Germany, renamed "Dustbin."
One can see the strong influence of the magazine illustration style of the 1930s to the 1950s, and that of American Realism and the Ashcan painters, a particularly interesting group in the history of American painting (7, 8).
Ashcan artist Everett Shinn's painting of this encapsulated-released violence, The Fight, 1899, depicts a group of local, faceless men fighting each other in a seedy part of New York City.
Sometimes Ashcan hoped his torturers would open the door of his windowless cell, just to see a face after weeks of silence and incommunicado.
Art work from the Ashcan Realist painters of the 1920s will help students "see" the era.
Indeed, like the rebel American painter Robert Henri, leader of the Ashcan School of the American realist movement, Asher does become a great artist.
The old masters, the French Impressionists, the Ashcan School, the abstract expressionists and the other various schools and trends no doubt each has supporters and enthusiasts.