asperity

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as·per·i·ty

 (ă-spĕr′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. as·per·i·ties
1.
a. Roughness or harshness, as of surface, sound, or climate: the asperity of northern winters.
b. Severity; rigor.
2. A slight projection from a surface; a point or bump.
3. Harshness of manner; ill temper or irritability.

[Middle English asperite, from Old French asprete, from Latin asperitās, from asper, rough.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

asperity

(æˈspɛrɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. roughness or sharpness of temper
2. roughness or harshness of a surface, sound, taste, etc
3. a condition hard to endure; affliction
4. (General Physics) physics the elastically compressed region of contact between two surfaces caused by the normal force
[C16: from Latin asperitās, from asper rough]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

as•per•i•ty

(əˈspɛr ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. harshness or sharpness of tone, temper, or manner; severity; acrimony.
2. hardship; difficulty; rigor.
3. roughness of surface; unevenness.
4. something rough or harsh.
[1200–50; < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin asperitās <asper rough]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asperity - something hard to endureasperity - something hard to endure; "the asperity of northern winters"
difficultness, difficulty - the quality of being difficult; "they agreed about the difficulty of the climb"
sternness - the quality (as of scenery) being grim and gloomy and forbidding; "the sternness of his surroundings made him uncomfortable"
2.asperity - harshness of mannerasperity - harshness of manner      
ill nature - a disagreeable, irritable, or malevolent disposition
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

asperity

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

asperity

noun
Something that obstructs progress and requires great effort to overcome:
difficulty, hardship, rigor, vicissitude (often used in plural).
Idioms: a hard nut to crack, a hard row to hoe, heavy sledding.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

asperity

[æsˈperɪtɪ] Naspereza f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

asperity

[æˈspɛrɪti] (formal) n (= sharpness) with asperity → sèchement
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

asperity

nSchroffheit f no pl, → Schärfe f no pl; the asperities of the winter (liter)der raue Winter (geh)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

asperity

[æˈspɛrɪtɪ] n (frm) (of manners, voice) → asprezza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
But with her son, the old lady had better success: he would listen to all she had to say, provided she could soothe his fretful temper, and refrain from irritating him by her own asperities; and I have reason to believe that she considerably strengthened his prejudice against me.
Satie's Gnossienne No 1 can be intriguingly disturbing - listen to Aldo Ciccolini's recording - but here, as elsewhere, asperities were smoothed out, possibilities unexplored, all subsumed under a glossy sheen of sound.
It was a general understanding that during the process of running-in, the asperities of hard materials with high pressure ploughed its softer counterpart and both of tribo-pairs worn out.
The latter is defined as the height of the airway asperities (e) divided by the hydraulic mean diameter (d = 4 A/Per).
This situation takes place at the summit of the highest asperities, and, because of the classical range of microgeometry amplitude, it may be possible to observe a local continuous film on the other part of the contact pair, particularly at the lowest asperities.
As shown in Figure 1, the micrographs for each PMMA specimen visibly revealed that a number of small indented asperities covered the initial surfaces thus produced negatively skewed topographic structures.
Table 4 comprises the parameters of asperities. The total seismic moment is 0.950 x [10.sup.21] N*m, which is close to the result of USGS and Harvard CMT solution.
[14] found that, due to damage of asperities in fracture, the flattener fracture surface was generated during shear, and this would provoke the decreasing surface roughness.
Additionally the asperities reduce the contact area (or effective radius) between the diamond and aluminum oxide surfaces for particles with size exceeding the pore opening funnel diameter.
It is the fact that the rough surface morphology affects the contact stiffness profoundly, and contact between surfaces is the interaction of asperities. Therefore, the interaction of asperities has been extensively studied.