asphyxia


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as·phyx·i·a

 (ăs-fĭk′sē-ə)
n.
A condition in which an extreme decrease in the concentration of oxygen in the body accompanied by an increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide leads to loss of consciousness or death. Asphyxia can be induced by choking, drowning, electric shock, injury, or the inhalation of toxic gases.

[New Latin, from Greek asphuxiā, stopping of the pulse : a-, not; see a-1 + sphuxis, heartbeat (from sphuzein, sphug-, to throb).]

asphyxia

(æsˈfɪksɪə)
n
(Pathology) lack of oxygen in the blood due to restricted respiration; suffocation. If severe enough and prolonged, it causes death
[C18: from New Latin, from Greek asphuxia a stopping of the pulse, from a-1 + sphuxis pulse, from sphuzein to throb]
asˈphyxial adj

as•phyx•i•a

(æsˈfɪk si ə)

n.
an extreme condition usu. involving loss of consciousness caused by lack of oxygen and excess of carbon dioxide in the blood, as from suffocation.
[1700–10; < New Latin < Greek asphyxía a stopping of the pulse]
as•phyx′i•al, adj.

as·phyx·i·a

(ăs-fĭk′sē-ə)
Suffocation resulting from a severe drop in the level of oxygen in the body, leading to loss of consciousness and sometimes death.

asphyxia

- Its original meaning was stoppage of the pulse.
See also related terms for pulse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asphyxia - a condition in which insufficient or no oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged on a ventilatory basisasphyxia - a condition in which insufficient or no oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged on a ventilatory basis; caused by choking or drowning or electric shock or poison gas
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
hypoxia - oxygen deficiency causing a very strong drive to correct the deficiency
hypercapnia, hypercarbia - the physical condition of having the presence of an abnormally high level of carbon dioxide in the circulating blood
Translations

asphyxia

[æsˈfɪksɪə] Nasfixia f

asphyxia

[æsˈfɪksɪə] nasphyxie f

asphyxia

nErstickung f, → Asphyxie f (spec)

asphyxia

[æsˈfɪksɪə] nasfissia

as·phyx·i·a

n. asfixia, sofocación, falta de respiración;
___ fetalis___ del feto.

asphyxia

n asfixia
References in classic literature ?
They who have been traveling long on the steppes of Tartary say, "On re-entering cultivated lands, the agitation, perplexity, and turmoil of civilization oppressed and suffocated us; the air seemed to fail us, and we felt every moment as if about to die of asphyxia.
A BABY died of asphyxia after he became entangled in a blind cord, an inquest heard yesterday.
Likewise, birth asphyxia among children is another common disease in which baby's brain and other organs do not get enough oxygen and lead to complication.
Five Palestinians were injured with live ammunition and two others with live ammunition in Ramallah city in West Bank, while 25 others suffered from temporary asphyxia after inhaling tear gas," the Palestinian Red Crescent (PRC) said in a statement.
The facility will provide services like total body cooling (therapeutic hypothermia) for neonatal asphyxia and nitric oxide therapy that caters to persistent pulmonary hypertension due to various causes such as Meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and more.
Birth asphyxia is among the five most common causes of death under five year's age1,2.
In relation to the case, the medical examiner has ruled that the child most likely died of asphyxia from being wedged between a bed and a wall, Des Moines,&nbsp;daily morning newspaper, the&nbsp;(https://www.
3, 11) The best-recognized risk factors for the development of SCFNN are perinatal asphyxia and therapeutic hypothermia.
Objective: To study the clinical effect of ganglioside (GM) and fructose-1, 6-diphosphate (FDP) on neonatal heart and brain injuries after asphyxia.
As per reports, five were referred to the hospital from Lunavada, Surendranagar, Mansa, Viramgam, Himmatnagar with critical conditions such as severe birth asphyxia, extreme preterm with birth weight 1.
A post-mortem examination was carried out by Dr Mark Lord who gave a provisional cause of death as asphyxia due to helium inhalation.
APATHOLOGIST has told a murder trial that there are no indications a 15-year-old girl died of asphyxia, contradicting findings from the time of her killing more than 40 years ago.