aspirant


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as·pi·rant

 (ăs′pər-ənt, ə-spīr′-)
n.
One who aspires, as to advancement, honors, or a high position.
adj.
Seeking recognition, distinction, or advancement.

aspirant

(ˈæspɪrənt; əˈspaɪərənt)
n
a person who aspires, as to a high position
adj
aspiring or striving

as•pir•ant

(ˈæs pər ənt, əˈspaɪər ənt)

n.
1. a person who aspires, as one who seeks or desires a career, advancement, status, etc.
adj.
2. aspiring.
[1730–40; (< French) < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aspirant - an ambitious and aspiring young personaspirant - an ambitious and aspiring young person; "a lofty aspirant"; "two executive hopefuls joined the firm"; "the audience was full of Madonna wannabes"
applicant, applier - a person who requests or seeks something such as assistance or employment or admission
Adj.1.aspirant - desiring or striving for recognition or advancementaspirant - desiring or striving for recognition or advancement
ambitious - having a strong desire for success or achievement

aspirant

noun
1. candidate, applicant, hopeful, aspirer, seeker, suitor, postulant He is among the few aspirants with administrative experience.
adjective

aspirant

noun
1. One who aspires:
2. A person who applies for or seeks something, such as a job or position:
Translations

aspirant

[ˈæspɪrənt] Naspirante mf, candidato/a m/f (to a)

aspirant

[ˈæspɪrənt]
naspirant(e) m/f
an aspirant to sth → un(e) aspirant(e) à qch
adj (= would-be) [politician] → en herbe

aspirant

nAnwärter(in) m(f) (→ to, for auf +acc); (for job) → Kandidat(in) m(f)(for für), Aspirant(in) m(f) (hum); (for sb’s hand in marriage) → Bewerber m(for um)

aspirant

[ˈæspɪrənt] naspirante m/f
References in classic literature ?
I am an aspirant to membership in the palace guard," I said, "and from yonder window in the tower where I was confined awaiting the final test for fitness I saw this brute attack the this woman.
But the thing has to be done scientifically, or the last state of the aspirant may be worse than the first.
Then the aspirant must not only be tested in those labours and dangers and pleasures which we mentioned before, but there is another kind of probation which we did not mention--he must be exercised also in many kinds of knowledge, to see whether the soul will be able to endure the highest of all, will faint under them, as in any other studies and exercises.
In a collection of so serious savages, there is never to be found any impatient aspirant after premature distinction, standing ready to move his auditors to some hasty, and, perhaps, injudicious discussion, in order that his own reputation may be the gainer.
Agnes says 'No,' but I say 'Yes,' and tell her that she little thinks what stores of knowledge have been mastered by the wonderful Being, at whose place she thinks I, even I, weak aspirant, may arrive in time.
Besides, he could not bind all that he had in his nature--the rover, the aspirant, the poet, the priest--in the limits of a single passion.
Addison, now recognized as the literary dictator of the age, had greatly pleased Pope, then a young aspirant for fame, by praising his 'Essay on Criticism,' and Pope rendered considerable help in the final revision of
Could you believe, my Ownest, that I came in here with the name of an aspirant to our Georgiana on my lips?
that she often was unable to understand), sufficed to make her reject an aspirant as unworthy: this one had neither heart nor delicacy; that one told lies, and was not religious; a third only wanted to coin money under the cloak of marriage; another was not of a nature to make a woman happy; here she suspected hereditary gout; there certain immoral antecedents alarmed her.
A true aspirant therefore never needs look for allusions personal and laudatory in discourse.
This consciousness of a missing measure gave him a certain mistrust of what might be said of him; and if circumspection is the essence of diplomacy our young aspirant promised well.
He said it was quite time she was walking out; he told Philip that she was very proud, and would have nothing to do with aspirants to that honour who lined up at the door, two by two, outside the Sunday school and craved the honour of escorting her home.