aspiration

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as·pi·ra·tion

 (ăs′pə-rā′shən)
n.
1. Expulsion of breath in speech.
2. Linguistics
a. The pronunciation of a consonant with an aspirate.
b. A speech sound produced with an aspirate.
3.
a. The act of breathing in; inhalation.
b. The act of drawing something, as liquid or a foreign object, into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
4. Medicine The process of removing fluids or gases from the body with a suction device.
5.
a. A strong desire for high achievement.
b. An object of such desire; an ambition.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aspiration

(ˌæspɪˈreɪʃən)
n
1. strong desire to achieve something, such as success
2. the aim of such desire
3. (Physiology)
a. the act of breathing
b. a breath
4. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics
a. the pronunciation of a stop with an audible and forceful release of breath
b. the friction of the released breath
c. an aspirated consonant
5. (Medicine) removal of air or fluid from a body cavity by suction
6. (Medicine) med
a. the sucking of fluid or foreign matter into the air passages of the body
b. the removal of air or fluid from the body by suction
ˌaspiˈrational adj
aspiratory adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

as•pi•ra•tion

(ˌæs pəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a strong desire, longing, or hope; ambition.
2. a goal or objective desired: The presidency had been his aspiration since college.
3. an act of aspirating, esp. inhalation.
4.
a. the articulation of a speech sound accompanied by an audible puff of breath.
b. the use of an aspirate in pronunciation.
5.
a. the act of removing a fluid, as pus or serum, from a cavity of the body by a hollow needle or trocar connected with a suction syringe.
b. the act of inhaling fluid or a foreign body into the bronchi and lungs, often after vomiting.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin]
as`pi•ra′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

aspiration

The use of suction to remove fluid from a body cavity, for example using a tube or syringe.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aspiration - a will to succeedaspiration - a will to succeed      
ambitiousness, ambition - a strong drive for success
2.aspiration - a cherished desireaspiration - a cherished desire; "his ambition is to own his own business"
desire - the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
American Dream - the widespread aspiration of Americans to live better than their parents did
emulation - ambition to equal or excel
nationalism - the aspiration for national independence felt by people under foreign domination
3.aspiration - a manner of articulation involving an audible release of breath
articulation - the aspect of pronunciation that involves bringing articulatory organs together so as to shape the sounds of speech
4.aspiration - the act of inhalingaspiration - the act of inhaling; the drawing in of air (or other gases) as in breathing
breathing, external respiration, respiration, ventilation - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation
breath - the process of taking in and expelling air during breathing; "he took a deep breath and dived into the pool"; "he was fighting to his last breath"
gasp, pant - a short labored intake of breath with the mouth open; "she gave a gasp and fainted"
drag, pull, puff - a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke); "he took a puff on his pipe"; "he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

aspiration

noun aim, longing, end, plan, hope, goal, design, dream, wish, desire, object, intention, objective, ambition, craving, endeavour, yearning, eagerness, Holy Grail (informal), hankering the needs and aspirations of our pupils
Quotations
"An aspiration is a joy for ever, a possession as solid as a landed estate, a fortune which we can never exhaust and which gives us year by a year a revenue of pleasurable activity" [Robert Louis Stevenson El Dorado]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

aspiration

noun
1. A strong desire to achieve something:
2. A fervent hope, wish, or goal:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
طُموح، مَطامِح
aspirace
aspirationstræben
metnaîarlöngun, metnaîur
吸引
ašpirácia

aspiration

[ˌæspəˈreɪʃən] N (also Ling) → aspiración f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

aspiration

[ˌæspɪˈreɪʃən] naspiration f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

aspiration

n
(hohes) Ziel, Aspiration f (geh); his aspiration towards (Brit) or toward (US) Lady Sarah’s hand (liter)seine Hoffnung auf Lady Sarahs Hand
(Phon) → Aspiration f, → Behauchung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

aspiration

[ˌæspəˈreɪʃn] naspirazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

aspire

(əˈspaiə) verb
(usually with to) to try very hard to reach (something difficult, ambitious etc). He aspired to the position of president.
ˌaspiˈration (ӕspi-) noun
(often in plural) an ambition. aspirations to become a writer.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

as·pi·ra·tion

n. aspiración, inhalación, succión, extracción de un líquido sin dejar entrar el aire;
___ biopsybiopsia con aguja.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aspiration

n aspiración f; needle — aspiración con aguja
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
He had great moments, beautiful and noble thoughts, generous aspirations, and a heart wide and warm enough for the whole race, but he had no bounds, no shape; he was as liberal as the casing air, but he was often as vague and intangible.
"My dear sir, a man of such noble aspirations is worthy of all esteem by virtue of those aspirations alone."
But if they are states at all, they embody some common conception of the good, some common aspirations of all their members.
It was thus rather the exacting nature of my aspirations than any particular degradation in my faults, that made me what I was, and, with even a deeper trench than in the majority of men, severed in me those provinces of good and ill which divide and compound man's dual nature.
Arthur is not what is commonly called a bad man: he has many good qualities; but he is a man without self-restraint or lofty aspirations, a lover of pleasure, given up to animal enjoyments: he is not a bad husband, but his notions of matrimonial duties and comforts are not my notions.
Dreams, aspirations, hopes, the past, the sordid exchange.
There had been nothing in her gay, frivolous life, her shallow ideals and aspirations, to fit her for that great change, or make the life to come seem to her anything but alien and unreal and undesirable.
The soft clasp of her fingers, clinging round his, roused his senses, fired his passion for her, swept out of his mind the pure aspirations which had filled it but the moment before, paralyzed his perception when it was just penetrating the mystery of her disturbed manner and her strange words.
For the touch of grief will render My wild nature more serene, Give to life new aspirations, A new trust in the unseen.
Then who was executing him, killing him, depriving him of life- him, Pierre, with all his memories, aspirations, hopes, and thoughts?
So I was left with the would-be periwinkle, who was reduced to Wurzburger without further ability to voice his aspirations to perch, melodious, upon the summit of a valley.
What it needed was not the conflicting aspirations of a people, but a will strong and one: it wanted not the babble of many voices, but a man--strong and one!