aspirin


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Related to aspirin: Paracetamol, Baby aspirin

as·pi·rin

(ăs′pər-ĭn, -prĭn)
n. pl. aspirin or as·pi·rins
1. A white, crystalline compound, C9H8O4, derived from salicylic acid and commonly used in tablet form to relieve pain and reduce fever and inflammation. It is also used as an antiplatelet agent. Also called acetylsalicylic acid.
2. A tablet of aspirin.

[Originally a trademark.]
Word History: The English word aspirin comes from the German trademark Aspirin, which is made up of elements from an obsolete German term for acetylsalicylic acid, acetylierte Spirsäure, literally, "acetylated Spiraea-acid." Acetylsalicylic acid was first isolated in a species of meadowsweet, Filipendula ulmaria, which was formerly classified in the genus Spiraea, the genus that includes many of the garden plants called spirea.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aspirin

(ˈæsprɪn)
n, pl -rin or -rins
1. (Pharmacology) a white crystalline compound widely used in the form of tablets to relieve pain and fever, to reduce inflammation, and to prevent strokes. Formula: CH3COOC6H4COOH. Chemical name: acetylsalicylic acid
2. (Pharmacology) a tablet of aspirin
[C19: from German, from A(cetyl) + Spir(säure) spiraeic acid (modern salicylic acid) + -in; see also spiraea]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

as•pi•rin

(ˈæs pər ɪn, -prɪn)

n., pl. -rin, -rins.
1. a white, crystalline substance, C9H8O4, derivative of salicylic acid, used as an anti-inflammatory agent and to relieve pain and fever; acetylsalicylic acid.
2. a tablet of this.
[1899; < German, orig. a trademark, =A(cetyl) acetyl + Spir(säure) salicylic acid (see spirea) + -in -in1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

as·pi·rin

(ăs′pər-ĭn, ăs′prĭn)
A white crystalline compound derived from salicylic acid and used as a drug to relieve fever and pain. Also called acetylsalicylic acid.
Did You Know? The forest may not look like a drugstore. Nevertheless, plants have always provided humans with powerful medicine. For example, we no longer eat the bark of willow trees when we have headaches, but for thousands of years, people in pain did just that. About 100 years ago, scientists studying willow bark figured out how it could be used to make acetylsalicylic acid, better known as aspirin. Aspirin and willow bark get broken down in the stomach to supply us with the same powerful painkiller. Quinine, which people use to control the fevers of the disease malaria, originally came from the cinchona tree. Just recently, researchers developed a new cancer drug, taxol, from the needles of yew trees. In fact, about 45 percent of all cancer drugs are either natural products or slightly altered natural chemicals that scientists tinkered with to make more potent. Researchers still study traditional plant remedies in the hopes of finding even more medicines from nature.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aspirin - the acetylated derivative of salicylic acidaspirin - the acetylated derivative of salicylic acid; used as an analgesic anti-inflammatory drug (trade names Bayer, Empirin, and St. Joseph) usually taken in tablet form; used as an antipyretic; slows clotting of the blood by poisoning platelets
analgesic, anodyne, pain pill, painkiller - a medicine used to relieve pain
aspirin powder, headache powder - a powdered form of aspirin
buffered aspirin, Bufferin - aspirin coated with a substance capable of neutralizing acid (trade name Bufferin)
enteric-coated aspirin - aspirin that is treated to pass through the stomach unaltered and to dissolve in the intestines
salicylate - a salt of salicylic acid (included in several commonly used drugs)
2-hydroxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid - a white crystalline substance with a bitter aftertaste; used as a fungicide or in making aspirin or dyes or perfumes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
أسْبِرينأَسْبيرين
аспирин
aspirin
aspirin
aspiriin
aspiriini
aspirin
aszpirin
aspirín
アスピリン
아스피린
aspirinas
aspirīns
aspirineaspirientje
aspirină
aspirín
aspirin
ยาแอสไพริน
thuốc aspirin

aspirin

[ˈæsprɪn] N (aspirin, aspirins (pl)) (= substance, tablet) → aspirina f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

aspirin

[ˈæspɪrɪn] naspirine f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

aspirin

nKopfschmerztablette f, → Aspirin® nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

aspirin

[ˈæsprɪn] naspirina
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

aspirin

(ˈӕspərin) noun
a (tablet of a) kind of pain-killing drug. The child has a fever – give her some/an aspirin.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

aspirin

أَسْبيرين aspirin aspirin Aspirin ασπιρίνη aspirina aspiriini aspirine aspirin aspirina アスピリン 아스피린 aspirine aspirin aspiryna aspirina аспирин aspirin ยาแอสไพริน aspirin thuốc aspirin 阿司匹林
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

as·pi·rin

n. aspirina, ácido acetilsalicílico.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

aspirin

n aspirina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyclooxygenase inhibitors and the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. N Engl J Med 2001; 345: 1809-17.
Role of Aspirin in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, he said, is well established but its role in primary prevention remains under discussion and there are different views by various physicians and the professional organizations, institutions.
In the last 30 years, interest in aspirin has resurged because in the 1980s, it was established that, at low doses, the drug is an effective anticoagulant that reduces the risk of blood clots and the underlying causes of many heart attacks and strokes.
With aspirin's anti-inflammatory properties in mind, researchers conducted randomized trials for secondary prevention of heart attacks in the 1970s; low- dose aspirin was proven effective in reducing risk for a second myocardial infarction.
A pain reliever and fever fighter, aspirin is also a blood thinner and is widely prescribed for patients with established cardiovascular disease, including those who've suffered a heart attack or stroke or undergone revascularization procedures to restore blood flow to the heart muscle.
But that thinking changed in 2018, when three clinical trials found the risks of aspirin used in primary prevention to be generally far greater than any benefit.
In the UK alone, 40% of over-60s take a low-dose daily aspirin to ward off heart attacks and strokes.
blacks and Hispanics, who have a higher risk of heart disease) to take either a daily enteric-coated aspirin (100 milligrams) or a placebo.
The finding, published in JAMA Oncology, looked at medical data from 205,498 women, including their use of low-dose aspirin, standard dose aspirin (325 mg), acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that do not contain aspirin, such as ibuprofen and naproxen.
[USA] Oct 5( ANI ): Taking a low-dose aspirin daily may help women lower their risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to a new study.
People with a high risk of blood clots, stroke, and heart attack can use aspirin long-term in low doses.
Sadanori Okada, M.D., from Nara Medical University in Kashihara, Japan, and colleagues conducted a post-trial follow-up of the Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis with Aspirin for Diabetes trial.