assertoric


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Related to assertoric: Apodicticity

assertoric

(ˌæsɜːˈtɒrɪk)
adj
1. (Logic) (of a statement) stating a fact, as opposed to expressing an evaluative judgment
2. (Logic) obsolete judging what is rather than what may or must be
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Any theoretical construction presented in assertoric discourse, besides information, contains a claim for the truth in the correspondence sense, i.
I'll then show that this version of the objection, though attractive, involves a conflation between epistemic and assertoric norms.
Hence, it is not susceptible to the kind of radical ambiguity that would undermine the assertoric value of images.
Como ha expuesto PRICE: "BRANDOM doesn't claim that making assertions is the only game we can play with language, of course, but he does claim that the assertoric game is both central and indispensable.
Beliefs, Schafer thus proposes, present their contents with assertoric force.
The assertoric language game is a coordination device for social creatures, whose welfare depends on collaborative action.
Modalities, for him, pertain to the relations of predication, without challenging the assertoric system of deductions simpliciter.
This approach is assertoric, the offering of questions in the form of statements that stake out a claim on the real and demand a response (Montgomery, 2008).
With Rorty, I believe that Putnam is untenably trying to hold onto "the objectivity of assertoric discourse," given his concession that "our norms and standards of warranted assertability" are contingent and do not converge upon a "fact of the matter.
Those on pragmatics cover assertoric interia, (quasi) performatives and presupposition accommodation; and speech acts, cognition, and language use.
Similarly, given Kant's scant attention to happiness in the Groundwork, Allison Hills' 'Happiness in the Groundwork' (Chapter 2), which considers Kant's distinctive desire-satisfaction theory of happiness, the kind of end that happiness is, and the status of the imperatives of prudence as assertoric hypothetical imperatives (rather than problematic hypothetical imperatives or categorical imperatives), sheds light on an important topic all too easy to overlook.
Can't an assertoric sentence, which was capable of functioning as an hypothesis, also be used as a foundation for research and action?