assimilation


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Related to assimilation: Cultural assimilation

as·sim·i·la·tion

 (ə-sĭm′ə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of assimilating.
b. The state of being assimilated.
2. Physiology The conversion of nutriments into living tissue; constructive metabolism.
3. Linguistics The process by which a sound is modified so that it becomes similar or identical to an adjacent or nearby sound. For example, the prefix in- becomes im- in impossible by assimilation to the labial p of possible.
4. The process whereby a minority group gradually adopts the customs and attitudes of the prevailing culture.

as•sim•i•la•tion

(əˌsɪm əˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or process of assimilating or the state of being assimilated.
2.
a. the conversion of absorbed food into the substance of the body.
b. the process of plant nutrition, including photosynthesis and the absorption of nutrient matter.
3. the merging of cultural traits from distinct cultural groups.
4. the act or process by which a speech sound becomes identical with or similar to a neighboring sound, as in (ˈgræm pɑ) for grandpa.
[1595–1605; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assimilation - the state of being assimilated; people of different backgrounds come to see themselves as part of a larger national family
relationship - a state involving mutual dealings between people or parties or countries
2.assimilation - the social process of absorbing one cultural group into harmony with anotherassimilation - the social process of absorbing one cultural group into harmony with another
Americanisation, Americanization - assimilation into American culture
Anglicisation, Anglicization - the act of anglicizing; making English in appearance
Europeanisation, Europeanization - assimilation into European culture
social process - a process involved in the formation of groups of persons
Westernisation, Westernization - assimilation of Western culture; the social process of becoming familiar with or converting to the customs and practices of Western civilization
3.assimilation - the process of absorbing nutrients into the body after digestionassimilation - the process of absorbing nutrients into the body after digestion
anabolism, constructive metabolism - the synthesis in living organisms of more complex substances (e.g., living tissue) from simpler ones together with the storage of energy
malabsorption - abnormal absorption of nutrients from the digestive tract
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
4.assimilation - a linguistic process by which a sound becomes similar to an adjacent sound
linguistic process - a process involved in human language
5.assimilation - the process of assimilating new ideas into an existing cognitive structureassimilation - the process of assimilating new ideas into an existing cognitive structure
education - the gradual process of acquiring knowledge; "education is a preparation for life"; "a girl's education was less important than a boy's"
6.assimilation - in the theories of Jean Piaget: the application of a general schema to a particular instance
developmental learning - learning that takes place as a normal part of cognitive development

assimilation

noun
The process of absorbing and incorporating, especially mentally:
Translations
تَمْثيل الطَّعَام بَعد هَضْمِه
asimilace
assimilationintegration
asimilacija
hasonulás
melting; aîlögun
asimilácia
kaynaşmaözümsemesindirme

assimilation

[əˌsɪmɪˈleɪʃən] Nasimilación f

assimilation

[əˌsɪmɪˈleɪʃən] n
[ideas, facts] → assimilation f
[person] → assimilation f

assimilation

n (of food, knowledge)Aufnahme f; (fig: into society etc also) → Integration f; his powers of assimilationseine geistige Aufnahmefähigkeit

assimilation

[əˌsɪmɪˈleɪʃn] nassimilazione f

assimilate

(əˈsiməleit) verb
to take in and digest. Plants assimilate food from the earth; I can't assimilate all these facts at once.
asˌsimiˈlation noun

as·sim·i·la·tion

n. asimilación, transformación y absorción por el organismo de los alimentos digeridos.

assimilation

n (psych) asimilación f
References in classic literature ?
And though an intimate intercourse under the same government will promote a gradual assimilation in some of these respects, yet there are causes, as well physical as moral, which may, in a greater or less degree, permanently nourish different propensities and inclinations in this respect.
And the increased intercourse among those of different States will contribute not a little to diffuse a mutual knowledge of their affairs, as this again will contribute to a general assimilation of their manners and laws.
Scientific people,' proceeded the Time Traveller, after the pause required for the proper assimilation of this, `know very well that Time is only a kind of Space.
The food that one eats is supposed to undergo certain chemical changes during the process of digestion and assimilation, the result, of course, being the rebuilding of wasted tissue.
It prevents the growth of dialects and helps on the process of assimilation.
I will not presume to say how far this irresistible power of assimilation extends; but if one civilised man were doomed to pass a dozen years amid a race of intractable savages, unless he had power to improve them, I greatly question whether, at the close of that period, he would not have become, at least, a barbarian himself.
And this assimilation of himself to another, either by the use of voice or gesture, is the imitation of the person whose character he assumes?
The doctor here will bear me out that on one occasion I tried to kill him for the purpose of strengthening my vital powers by the assimilation with my own body of his life through the medium of his blood, relying of course, upon the Scriptural phrase, `For the blood is the life.
It was as if a new birth, with stronger assimilations than the first, had converted the forest-land, still so uncongenial to every other pilgrim and wanderer, into Hester Prynne's wild and dreary, but life-long home.
For example, if the new member can find others who also have the same sense of humor, then s/he may be able to use it to her/his advantage to persuade others and make the assimilation process less difficult with those same people.
Mineral compositions vary as magmas evolve in sub-volcanic, lithospheric magma chambers by assimilation and differentiation.
These attributes, Huntington argues, have combined to make Hispanics less likely to adopt American values and American culture, especially in a nation whose elites have embraced a multicultural ideology that makes assimilation ever more difficult.