assimilative


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as·sim·i·la·tive

 (ə-sĭm′ə-lā′tĭv) also as·sim·i·la·to·ry (-lə-tôr′ē)
adj.
Marked by or causing assimilation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.assimilative - capable of mentally absorbing ; "assimilative processes", "assimilative capacity of the human mind"
receptive, open - ready or willing to receive favorably; "receptive to the proposals"
2.assimilative - capable of taking (gas, light, or liquids) into a solution; "an assimilative substance
absorbent, absorptive - having power or capacity or tendency to absorb or soak up something (liquids or energy etc.); "as absorbent as a sponge"

assimilative

adjective
Having a capacity or tendency to absorb or soak up:
References in classic literature ?
It is one of the bitterest apportionments of a lot of slavery, that the negro, sympathetic and assimilative, after acquiring, in a refined family, the tastes and feelings which form the atmosphere of such a place, is not the less liable to become the bond-slave of the coarsest and most brutal,--just as a chair or table, which once decorated the superb saloon, comes, at last, battered and defaced, to the barroom of some filthy tavern, or some low haunt of vulgar debauchery.
The first chapter titled as 'Concept of Indian Aesthetics' surveying the development of the term, 'aesthetics', introduces some other significant aspects of Indian Knowledge System that helped the growth of this branch of philosophy that seems to be more associated with literature due to its assimilative application in it.
Chapter 4, "Gothic Charm School, or, How Vampires Learned to Sparkle," traces the evolution from the classic vampire to the more assimilative and sparkling variety.
It shows how BR moved diagonally upwards from Passive Learning Networks and Assimilative Capability to Innovation Networks and Generative Capabilities.
Horenczyk and Tatar (2002) conceptualized and assessed teachers' attitudes toward multiculturalism on a scale ranging from a pluralistic ideology to an assimilative ideology.
The reality of incarnation - as possibly pronounced by your contributor - is, to me, absorbable and assimilative. Derek Jeffery, Heswall Landlord group AS A RETIRED professional landlord and an authority on all aspects of residential property letting procedures, including the eviction of tenants, I would like to form a much-needed advice and ongoing free support group for Liverpool private landlords.
The federal government had begun to crack down on reservation gambling as Prohibition swept the country.<br />Gambling by Native Americans had been outlawed in 1825 with the passage of the Assimilative Crime Act, even as the rest of the nation and the Western territories in particular had wide open gambling.
The council's objectives to function as a catalyst that leads to improved assimilative outcomes for countries with Muslim populations and greater constructive narratives on the true essence of what it is to be a Muslim, will play a significant role in combating the pervasiveness of extreme ideology that is doing incalculable harm to the image of Islam.
Again, Sangster reveals that these documentaries became more tolerant of Indigenous culture, though they maintained a tendency toward assimilative storylines.
Such information could be crucial for initial-value and assimilative models providing operational space-weather forecasts.
While elements of the narrative are very like those of the Lorik-Chandaini ballads of eastern Uttar Pradesh and central India, the Candayan is a complex text containing Indian and Persian generic set-pieces such as the barahmasa, a poem describing twelve months of separation from the beloved, or the sarapa, a head-to-foot description of the beloved, woven into the narrative in a way that Behl describes as "both assimilative and competitive" in order to create "a distinctive Sufi poetics of prema-rasa, a desi Islam" (p.