asinine

(redirected from assinine)

as·i·nine

 (ăs′ə-nīn′)
adj.
1. Utterly stupid or silly: asinine behavior.
2. Of, relating to, or resembling an ass.

[Latin asinīnus, of an ass, from asinus, ass, of pre-Roman Mediterranean origin; akin to Armenian ēs, Greek onos, and Hieroglyphic Luwian -asna- in tarkasna-, ass, all probably ultimately from an ancient Near Eastern source akin to Sumerian anše, ass, and perhaps Akkadian atānu, she-ass.]

as′i·nine′ly adv.
as′i·nin′i·ty (-nĭn′ĭ-tē) n.

asinine

(ˈæsɪˌnaɪn)
adj
1. obstinate or stupid
2. (Zoology) resembling an ass
[C16: from Latin asinīnus, from asinus ass1]
ˈasiˌninely adv
asininity n

as•i•nine

(ˈæs əˌnaɪn)

adj.
1. unintelligent; silly; stupid.
2. of or like an equine ass.
[1600–10; < Latin asinīnus=asin(us) ass1 + -īnus -ine1]
as′i•nine`ly, adv.
as`i•nin′i•ty (-ˈnɪn ɪ ti) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.asinine - devoid of intelligence
foolish - devoid of good sense or judgment; "foolish remarks"; "a foolish decision"

asinine

adjective stupid, silly, foolish, daft (informal), senseless, goofy (informal), idiotic, inane, fatuous, moronic, imbecile, gormless (Brit. informal), brainless, imbecilic, braindead (informal), dumb-ass (slang), dead from the neck up (informal), thickheaded, dunderheaded, halfwitted, thick-witted I have never heard such an asinine discussion.
bright, sharp, smart, wise, clever, intelligent, sensible, sage, sane, brainy (informal), quick-witted
Translations
aasiaasimainentyperä
asininaasininumasininus
głupiośli

asinine

[ˈæsɪnaɪn] ADJ
1. (frm) (= ass-like) → asnal
2. (= stupid) → estúpido

asinine

[ˈæsɪnaɪn] adj (= idiotic, moronic) [person, answer] → sot(te)

asinine

adjidiotisch; what an asinine thing to do!wie kann man bloß so ein Esel sein!

asinine

[ˈæsɪnaɪn] adj (liter) → asinesco/a, asinino/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The law could be errant and assinine, badly conceived and full of perjury, and the consideration of the relations among law and lawlessness, nation and providence, is something that Teague draws out in drawing comparisons between the Gunpowder Plot and the plot of Volpone.
Vaughan blasted: ``It is assinine to make this sort of comment to the media.
The public supported press restrictions because it perceived the press as "assinine," according to a general who received hundred of letters from citizens about his press briefings.