assonance


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Related to assonance: onomatopoeia

as·so·nance

 (ăs′ə-nəns)
n.
1. Resemblance of sound, especially of the vowel sounds in words, as in: "that dolphin-torn, that gong-tormented sea" (William Butler Yeats).
2. The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants, as in the phrase tilting at windmills.
3. Rough similarity; approximate agreement.

[French, from Latin assonāre, to respond to : ad-, ad- + sonāre, to sound; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

as′so·nant adj. & n.
as′so·nan′tal (-năn′tl) adj.

assonance

(ˈæsənəns)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of the same vowel sound with different consonants or the same consonant with different vowels in successive words or stressed syllables, as in a line of verse. Examples are time and light or mystery and mastery
2. partial correspondence; rough similarity
[C18: from French, from Latin assonāre to sound, from sonāre to sound]
ˈassonant adj, n
assonantal adj

as•so•nance

(ˈæs ə nəns)

n.
1. similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. rhyme in which the same vowel sounds are used with different consonants in the stressed syllables of the rhyming words, as in penitent and reticence.
[1720–30; < French, =asson(ant) (< Latin assonant-, s. of assonāns, present participle of assonāre to sound; see as-, sound1)]
as′so•nant, adj., n.
as`so•nan′tal (-ˈnæn tl) as`so•nan′tic, adj.

assonance

- The condition of the words of a phrase or verse having the same sound or termination without rhyming.
See also related terms for rhyme.

assonance

likeness or approximate similarity in sound.
See also: Sound
resemblance of sound, particularly vowel sounds, occurring in words of close proximity.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

assonance

Use of words which repeat similar vowel sounds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assonance - the repetition of similar vowels in the stressed syllables of successive words
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
Translations

assonance

[ˈæsənəns] Nasonancia f

assonance

nAssonanz f
References in classic literature ?
French verse, on the other hand, had rime (or assonance) and carefully preserved identity in the total number of syllables in corresponding lines, but it was uncertain as regarded the number of clearly stressed ones.
The article displays the '12 Men's Brands You Need To Know' and includes (in strictly alphabetical order) Respect Your Universe, playing with the assonance between the street fighter character RYU and the acronym of the brand's name, but mostly focusing on the '...engineering gear for the mobile athlete', and stressing also the versatility and the comfort of the products.
Further, the centre has a 20-room residential complex, which provides adequate shelter for 120 orphans and their families in an area where people need assonance and proper housing.
Rather than trying to mirror all the specific musical qualities of the Arabic, I've sought to capture the poetic feel of the Arabic through a modern musicality that uses internal rhyme ( spine/hind ) assonance ( hind, rise, I ), consonance ( Seven Sisters, stables, solid stone ), and other effects, including the occasional use of strong and weak end rhyme ( me/sea and night/respite ).
"We began the development process and incorporated features like video, music, news in assonance with chat," he said.
Oliver Pickering claims one of the many hybrid versions of Nine Points Best Pleasing to God as prose heightened with rhyme and assonance; Susan Powell supplements her edition of Mirk's Festial with additional historical and textual notes and Margaret Connolly, too, revisits earlier work, discussing Chapter AB from Contemplations of the Dread and Love of God, which circulated independently of and possibly existed before the main text.
Basic concepts such as meter, assonance and consonance, rhythm and rhyme, couplets and quatrains are explored in fun, non-threatening terms.
I argued with strangers about the importance of "assonance." (I revised those arguments when enough strangers pointed out that I actually didn't know what the word "assonance" meant.) I started drinking black coffee and carrying around a worn copy of Ulysses--a book that I found to be utterly incomprehensible and therefore, for some reason, life-changing.
Making clever use of assonance and repetition of phrases and phrasing, the rhythm is so strong it practically creates its own tune.
Alliteration, repetition, assonance, and consonance are all on display as the poem continues:
Here a sparkling piece of assonance, there a witty, pithy truth, and over there - way over yonder, beyond the damp January thickets - some piece of wisdom you truly didn't know you had.
In general, the assonance strategy gives a Chinese sound similar to the English word and an associated interesting explanation.