assonance

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as·so·nance

 (ăs′ə-nəns)
n.
1. Resemblance of sound, especially of the vowel sounds in words, as in: "that dolphin-torn, that gong-tormented sea" (William Butler Yeats).
2. The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants, as in the phrase tilting at windmills.
3. Rough similarity; approximate agreement.

[French, from Latin assonāre, to respond to : ad-, ad- + sonāre, to sound; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

as′so·nant adj. & n.
as′so·nan′tal (-năn′tl) adj.

assonance

(ˈæsənəns)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of the same vowel sound with different consonants or the same consonant with different vowels in successive words or stressed syllables, as in a line of verse. Examples are time and light or mystery and mastery
2. partial correspondence; rough similarity
[C18: from French, from Latin assonāre to sound, from sonāre to sound]
ˈassonant adj, n
assonantal adj

as•so•nance

(ˈæs ə nəns)

n.
1. similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. rhyme in which the same vowel sounds are used with different consonants in the stressed syllables of the rhyming words, as in penitent and reticence.
[1720–30; < French, =asson(ant) (< Latin assonant-, s. of assonāns, present participle of assonāre to sound; see as-, sound1)]
as′so•nant, adj., n.
as`so•nan′tal (-ˈnæn tl) as`so•nan′tic, adj.

assonance

- The condition of the words of a phrase or verse having the same sound or termination without rhyming.
See also related terms for rhyme.

assonance

likeness or approximate similarity in sound.
See also: Sound
resemblance of sound, particularly vowel sounds, occurring in words of close proximity.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

assonance

Use of words which repeat similar vowel sounds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assonance - the repetition of similar vowels in the stressed syllables of successive words
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
Translations

assonance

[ˈæsənəns] Nasonancia f

assonance

nAssonanz f
References in classic literature ?
French verse, on the other hand, had rime (or assonance) and carefully preserved identity in the total number of syllables in corresponding lines, but it was uncertain as regarded the number of clearly stressed ones.
It is difficult to find an adequate example of the assonances or partial rhymes that seem to drive the poems' melodies, but one example from "Goldsmith" in "Kells" shows Harpur's wordplay: "Do not depict the likeness of things / but the Ideas from which they arise-/ not a rose, but Rose, in which / a rose will be the essence / of all roses." The advice given here in an imagined dialogue between a contemporary poet and this ancient scribe is perhaps the best summary of Harpur's achievement in this worthwhile collection of poetry.
And this show, which revisits his work from the late 1960s to the present, creates a dialogue through assonances among works from different decades.
Though Fried is certainly not the first (see Ricardou, Starobinski, Duchet, for example) to comb through passages of Mudame Bovary in search of alliterations, assonances and repetitions, what sets his work apart is his keen interest in the question of intention or consciousness, which others have left largely untouched.
Furthermore, and possibly even more ironically, by confining the study of imperialism to a national methodological framework, and by according centre stage to the British and French empires, postcolonial scholars have often unwittingly reproduced, rather than deconstructed, the hegemonic relations shaped in the course of the 18th and the 19th century, leaving largely unexplored the assonances and collusions that connected large-scale to small-scale empires, and policies implemented at home with extra-European colonial practices.
Toutes avaient des memes assonances, des memes rythmiques: l'unite des moyens, des objectifs.