References in classic literature ?
Never shall I cease to pray to God for you; and, should my prayers ever reach Him and be received of Heaven, then assuredly fortune will smile upon you!
"No; he will be very unhappy, and will assuredly bless the moment when he feels that he has freed himself from the fatal shoes."
``It is the good knight my master's,'' answered Gurth, ``of which, assuredly, I would not have spoken a word, had you been satisfied with working your will upon mine own property.''
The Pall Mall, on the other hand, declares that Letheringham will assuredly be sent for to-morrow."
Assuredly, we must conclude so, if we are to credit the accounts of such gentlemen as Pliny, and the ancient naturalists generally.
And assuredly, the secret man heareth many confessions.
If in Halpin's youth his mother had "spoiled" him, he had assuredly done his part toward being spoiled.
Here do I sit now, In this the smallest oasis, Like a date indeed, Brown, quite sweet, gold-suppurating, For rounded mouth of maiden longing, But yet still more for youthful, maidlike, Ice-cold and snow-white and incisory Front teeth: and for such assuredly, Pine the hearts all of ardent date-fruits.
It was Pantocyclus -- the illustrious Circle mentioned above, as the queller of the Colour Revolt -- who first convinced mankind that Configuration makes the man; that if, for example, you are born an Isosceles with two uneven sides, you will assuredly go wrong unless you have them made even -- for which purpose you must go to the Isosceles Hospital; similarly, if you are a Triangle, or Square, or even a Polygon, born with any Irregularity, you must be taken to one of the Regular Hospitals to have your disease cured; otherwise you will end your days in the State Prison or by the angle of the State Executioner.
"If I could die," he said, "I should go where he goes, and should assuredly find him again.
It was probably on account of this accident that it ceased to be the seat of the governors of Massachusetts; for, assuredly, it would have been ominous of evil to the commonwealth if the chair of state had tottered upon three legs.
one of them holds possession of the Tuileries, one of them is giving Philibert Delorme a scar across the middle of his face; and it is not, assuredly, one of the least of the scandals of our time to see with what effrontery the heavy architecture of this gentleman is being flattened over one of the most delicate façades of the Renaissance!