asterid


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asterid

(ˈæstərɪd)
n
a clade or variety of flowering planta member of the starfish family Asteridae
adj
relating to a clade or variety of flowering plant
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Almost 80% of the approved drugs and 67% of the clinical-trial drugs concentrated in 17 and 30 drug-prolific families, respectively, including Fabid and Malvid groups of the Rosidae subclass, the Lamiid and Campanulid groups of the Asterid subclass, and the Ranunculales order [24].
A morphological matrix (Table 6) based on the asterid taxa used by Bremer et al.
Bremer, "Molecular phylogenetic dating of asterid flowering plants shows early cretaceous diversification," Systematic Biology, vol.
Plantains (Plantago L.) are widely distributed herbs and shrubs from the asterid family Plantaginaeae.
Tranchant-Dubreuil et al., "Ancestral synteny shared between distantly-related plant species from the asterid (Coffea canephora and Solanum Sp.) and rosid (Vitis vinifera) clades" BMC Genomics, vol.
The fact that nearly all other species of Austromirini are found on dicot angiosperms (mostly rosid and asterid flowering plants) suggests that grass affiliation is likely a host switching event.
TANGIERS angriest astringe ganister gantries ingrates rangiest reasting stearing tasering and IRSTEAD aridest asterid astride diaster disrate staider staired tardies tirades each have nine.
At least some families even in the most recently derived of the plant clades used in this analysis date to this time, such as, Urticaceae (a member of Rosid 1 in Chase et al., 1993): 90 M.Y.B.P., Rutaceae (Rosid 2): 52 M.Y.B.P., Apiaceae (Asterid 2): 52 M.Y.B.P., Apocynaceae (Asterid 1): 60 M.Y.B.P.
Such divergent clades might have been lost with the evolution of Arabidopsis lineage or gained along with the development o[micro]lineages of rosid and asterid. The subgroups which are closer show that the genes have originated from the same duplication event.
Both orbicule presence and absence is recorded from the earliest diverging flowering plants up to most recent diversified asterid clades.
However, recently, following the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III classification, Larsson (2007) showed that the distribution of CPT in plants is restricted to the Asterid group members only.